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How to Talk to Your Loved One About Addiction

By Jennifer McDougall

Sitting back and watching a loved one spiral out of control is heart-wrenching. The person you once knew has become angry, unstable, and quite possibly irresponsible. We know that you want to help them as best as you can. Without forcing them into rehab, it’s better if they see the choice as their own, but that you helped open their eyes to acknowledge a life-threatening problem. Don’t wait for them to lose everything before you step in and lend a helping hand. There are many things to expect, as this is not always a comfortable or easy process. Here are a few things to keep in mind before you initiate the conversation to motivate them into the right direction.

  • The person you love and care deeply about is most likely in denial. They may not believe there is a problem to begin with. It will take time for them to accept the fact that they are on a dangerous path that could be fatal and completely detrimental to everyone involved. They may think they’re behavior is normal and since they are alive and functioning there is nothing to discuss. This is where they are wrong and you shouldn’t give up persistence on the matter.
  • Expect volatile and emotional behaviors as this confrontation will be upsetting for them. Try your best not to fuel the fire with more anger. Make your points clear to them in a way that will stop them from yelling after they’ve screamed at you, told you how wrong you are, and how little you know about anything they are experiencing.

Many of those who are addicted to drugs and alcohol spiral out of control whether it is immediately after being hooked on a substance or gradually over time. They desperately want to grab a hold of something that gives them purpose and fills void. Typically, they feel as though their lives are meaningless and no one really cares what they are experiencing.

Reaching for the bottle or a syringe to get high takes them away from the place they feel unwanted and forgotten. It’s painful for everyone involved: the addicted person, the family members, co-workers who witness the destruction, and friends who want to help. The addict may begin hearing that their condition is a disease and they are powerless over their own demons. That is not true. At Passages, we don’t believe that addiction is an incurable disease.  We believe in the empowering nature that as humans, we can overcome any obstacle that is put in our way; that if we look at what is causing the problem and focus on healing the underlying conditions then it is absolutely possible to break free and live an addiction-free life.

We believe that those who become dependent on drugs and alcohol do so for the following reasons:

  1. A chemical imbalance
  2. Events of the past you have not reconciled
  3. Current conditions you can’t cope with
  4. Things you believe that aren’t true

Chances are your loved one is struggling with one or more of these factors. In order for them to overcome their addiction they will need to enter a treatment center, such as Passages Addiction Treatment Centers where the healing process is focused on treating the underlying conditions. Talking to your loved one may seem uncomfortable at first, but it’s important that you don’t hesitate as the problem could grow increasingly worse. Here are 7 key points to focus on.

  1. Put a stop to enabling You may not realize it, but you could be making the problem worse by creating excuses for them, or sugarcoating the condition. Be stern about ground rules and the expectations you have for them. Hold them to their promises and commitments. Let nothing slide.
  2. Educate yourself as well as friends and family on everything there is to know about addiction. Start by purchasing a copy of The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure, written by Pax and Chris Prentiss.
  3. Ask questions. Find out what it is that is driving them to use drugs and alcohol as coping mechanisms. Let them open up to you. Listen attentively and make eye contact assuring them that you care and hear what they are saying.
  4. Make them feel loved instead of judged. Avoid using the term “addict” when addressing them. Don’t yell or make harsh threats. Try to avoid using phrases that belittle their worth. Instead, empower them and remind them of their strengths, aspirations, accomplishments, and how much they matter to you.
  5. Consider hiring a professional interventionist to conduct an intervention at home or somewhere private.
  6. Provide them with information on treatment centers. Give them brochures, contact information, photos, and enlightening reading material. Talk to them about the many treatment options available for them to get help and put a stop to this brutal battle.
  7. Suggest alternative options for coping with pain, social anxiety, or trauma. Provide them with a list of things to do and give them a sense of hope that things can get better with change. Life doesn’t have to be unmanageable or painful. It can be fulfilling and full of life if you’re willing to make real lifestyle changes.

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Photo courtesy of: Jennifer McDougall

prescription medication
Prescription Drug Addiction

Prescription Medication: Confronting a Growing Problem

The misuse and growing dependency problems surrounding prescription painkillers have reached significant levels in the US.  Forbes recently ran an article that reported how 40,000 Americans no perish each year from prescription medication overdose.  In fact, more people die from prescription medication than by car accidents or violent crimes.

This is a relatively recent development, spurred largely by the proliferation of pharmaceuticals like OxyContin, and other opioids, many of which are based on formulations of oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone.  As of 2007, 99% of all the hydrocodone (found in Vicodin) in the world was consumed in the US.

Between 1990 and 2012, drug overdoses in the US doubled. Of those, almost 60% occured as a result of prescription medication.

The Clinical Journal of Pain has pinned the total cost from non-medical abuse of painkillers at $53 billion.  That staggering amount was totaled by including lost workplace productivity, treatment, and associated medical complications.

Recent data from The White House shows that one third of people using illegal drugs first began with prescription drugs. The picture is coming very clear. Something needs to be done.

While immediately following surgery or injuries, painkillers can allow for an individual to cope with the pain of recovery, the use of these medications for more than 90 days drastically increases the overall likelihood of dependence.

Additionally, extreme caution is needed when prescribing prescription pain treatment medication to children under the age of 18.

At this point in time, some physicians prescribe extremely powerful pain medication for patients dealing with recurring lower-back pain, chronic headaches, and other ongoing medical issues.  Rather than focusing on patient wellness, many physicians take steps in treatment that solve short-term problems, without a long-term solution in mind.

As individual tolerance builds up, these patients need higher dosages to achieve similar results.  While the pain they feel may be perceived as “needing” more medication, the negative health effects such as cardiac or repertory failure, draw nearer with each heightened dose.

A more appropriate solution to pain management should include the administration of these medications as a part of a comprehensive and holistic treatment strategy.  More centralized data collection would also be appropriate, to help physicians track patients who have developed dependencies on painkillers or those who participate in “doctor shopping.”

While individual American consumers are ultimately responsible for their own behavior, a great degree of responsibility could also be placed on the physicians who better understand the full spectrum of health risks associated with prescription medication.

Via Forbes

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Passages Malibu & Passages Ventura Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers Support National Prevention Week

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Malibu, Calif. (May 17, 2012) Passages Malibu and Passages Ventura, the world’s leading drug and alcohol rehab centers, are proud to support the first annual National Prevention Week, which is held from Monday, May 21, 2012 through Friday, May 25, 2012. This health observance is an opportunity for community members and leaders to learn more about behavioral health issues and get involved in ongoing prevention efforts.

National Prevention Week is a new annual health observance week that is supported by SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) to celebrate and support the work that community organizations, individuals, healthcare providers, and treatment centers, such as Passages Malibu and Passages Ventura, do year round to help heal and to promote mental, emotional, and behavioral well-being.

National Prevention Week’s themes are as follows:

Monday, May 21: Prevention of Underage Drinking
Tuesday, May 22: Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse and Illicit Drug Use
Wednesday, May 23: Prevention of Alcohol Abuse
Thursday, May 24: Suicide Prevention
Friday, May 25: Promotion of Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Well-Being

Being a drug and alcohol treatment center that takes the holistic approach to healing the mind, body, and spirit to help promote overall wellness, balance, health, and freedom from substance and alcohol dependency, Passages is thrilled that this new observance has been placed on our national calendar.

“My hope is that we can bring more awareness to the growing problems of underage drinking, prescription drug abuse, and illicit drug use this year and the years to come. National Prevention Week gives us the opportunity to just that. Bringing awareness to these important issues in our society is exactly what’s going to create positive change. Hopefully, everyone will participate in spreading the message during this week and beyond,” says Pax Prentiss, CEO and co-founder of Passages Malibu and Passages Ventura.

National Prevention Week 2012 is timed for the start of summer because, as SAMHSA explains, “Summer is a season filled with celebrations and recreational activities that can potentially be linked to substance use and abuse, such as graduation parties, proms, weddings, boating, and camping excursions. It is also timed to allow schools to take part in a prevention-themed event before the school year ends, raising awareness in students of all ages. The percentages of marijuana, cigarette, and alcohol initiates among youth increase between spring (April and May) and summer (June and July), and the timing of National Prevention Week 2012 will help to raise awareness in youth at this crucial time of year.”

If you or a loved one is in need of help with an addiction to any type of substance – alcohol, heroin, cocaine, marijuana, prescription medicine, painkillers, or any other type of addictive substance – help is out there. Passages Malibu and Passages Ventura offer customized, holistic, non-12 Step treatment plans for every type of addiction. Their addiction treatment centers in Malibu and Ventura, California are two of only 6% of the nation’s behavioral health treatment programs that have earned the coveted JCAHO accreditation.

Please join Passages Malibu, Passages Ventura, and SAMHSA in spreading the word of National Prevention Week.

About Passages Malibu & Passages Ventura:

Founded by Chris Prentiss and Pax Prentiss, Passages Malibu opened in 2001 with its second location, Passages Ventura, opening in 2009. The two drug and alcohol abuse treatment centers offer an alternative to the 12 Step/AA model of addiction treatment by taking a holistic approach with a program that focuses on the underlying issues of substance dependency, rather than suggesting that addiction is an incurable disease. Passages Malibu and Passages Ventura have earned the coveted JCAHO (Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations) accreditation, which has only been given to 6% of the nation’s behavioral health treatment programs. The co-founders are also authors of the acclaimed series of treatment books that include their groundbreaking flagship book, “The Alcoholism & Addiction Cure.” At Passages, we believe: Addiction Ends Here™.

For general inquiries about treatment, contact: 866-233-1753

For more information:
www.passagesmalibu.com
www.passagesventura.com
www.facebook.com/passagesaddictionrehabcenter/
www.twitter.com/passagesrehab
www.youtube.com/passages

For media inquiries, contact:
press@passagesmalibu.com

Addiction, Addiction Treatment Centers, Alcohol Rehab, Chemical Dependency, Dependency, Drug Rehab, Passages Malibu, Passages Rehabs, Prescription Drug Addiction, Recovery, Rehab, Rehab Facilities, Rehab Programs, Residential Treatment Facilities, Teen Addiction

Got Drugs? Give Them Back On Drug Take Back Day

This weekend, the Drug Enforcement Administration is helping Americans do a little responsible spring-cleaning and bring awareness to the growing problem prescription drug abuse at the same time. The DEA’s 4th National Prescription Drug Take Back Day takes place this Saturday, April 28, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. nationwide where anyone can discard their unused, unwanted, and expired prescription drugs in a safe and anonymous way.

“Take Back Day is important because it gives us an opportunity to do a public service by collecting unused, unwanted, and expired drugs that are sitting in people’s houses, in their medicine cabinets, and they really don’t know what to do with them, and they just continue to collect them and they pile up,” Harry S. Sommers, special agent in charge of the DEA Atlanta field division, told CNN on Friday.

It’s a timely event as recent studies have shown that prescription drug abuse is on the rise, and, in fact, as Sommers points out, “Prescription drugs, most studies show now, are the most abused drug this side of marijuana in America today.”

The danger of having extra prescription drugs lingering around a household are two-fold: 1) Children, teens, and their friends can, and often do, get into the medicine cabinet and take the drugs for recreational use, often times leading to addiction; and 2) Those who the drugs were prescribed to are more likely to return to that drug when it’s not necessary. For instance, one day you’re prescribed Vicodin after a surgery, and the next month you are taking it to simply feel good or for minor aches and pains.

Another recent study showed that prescription drug abuse often begins at the hand of a family member or friend “lending” that friend or relative one of their prescription pills for simple ailments such as headaches, back pain, and muscle aches that could be easily treated with over-the-counter pain medicines. According to the study, based on data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health released this Wednesday, more than 70% of people who abuse prescription painkillers have obtained the drug from friends or family.

So, what can you do to participate in National Prescription Drug Take Back Day? Go through your medicine cabinets, gather up all expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs (they’ll even take over-the-counter drugs as long as it’s not in liquid form), and march on over to your local drug collection agency.

The DEA has made the drug drop-off process easy by setting up a website where you enter your city and zip code, and it provides you with a list of free and anonymous collection sites in your area. Approximately 5,000 collections sites are participating nationwide.

To find out where to drop off your prescription drugs, go to: http://1.usa.gov/IdKOc3

To learn more about prescription drug addiction and how to cure it, go to www.passagesmalibu.com and www.passagesventura.com.

Passages Malibu and Passages Ventura support the DEA’s 4th National Prescription Drug Take Back Day and encourages everyone to discard their drugs safely this Saturday.

Addiction, Addiction Treatment Centers, Alcohol Addiction, Alcohol Rehab, Amphetamine Addiction, Chemical Dependency, Cocaine Addiction, Crystal Meth Addiction, Dependency, Drug Rehab, Ecstasy Addiction, GHB Addiction, Heroin Addiction, Inpatient Alcohol Rehab, Inpatient Drug Rehab, Inpatient Rehab, Ketamine Addiction, LSD Addiction, Marijuana Addiction, Marijuana Dependency, Nicotine Addiction, Opiate Addiction, Outpatient Rehab, Passages Malibu, Passages Rehabs, Prescription Drug Addiction, Psychedelic Mushrooms Addiction, Recovery, Rehab, Rehab Facilities, Rehab Programs, Residential Treatment Facilities

Passages Malibu Launches Innovative New Website

Passages Malibu is a pioneer in drug and alcohol addiction treatment with its holistic, groundbreaking, alternative to the 12 Step/AA method of addiction treatment and recovery and now the world renowned treatment center has created an innovative way to experience their 5-star facilities through the Passages Malibu Treatment Experience virtual tour.

The new tour is the centerpiece of Passages Substance Abuse & Addiction Treatment Center’s revamped website (www.passagesmalibu.com), which re-launched this week with more video and more ways to interact via social media, such as the inclusion of Google+ to our Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube offerings. The new website and virtual tour are just few new ways that Passages stays on the cutting edge of the recovery industry.

“We didn’t just want to produce the typical virtual tour that you often see, but rather give the viewer an in-depth look at what the Passages treatment experience is all about. We wanted to tell a personal story about how we can change, and often times save, our clients’ lives, and show them exactly what they will be getting when they check into Passages. We are passionate about recovery and I think this new virtual tour shows just that,” says Pax Prentiss, CEO and co-founder of Passages Malibu and Passages Ventura.

The extended version of the beautifully shot video tour (available at www.passagesmalibutour.com) not only gives a never-before-seen look at what treatment at Passages Malibu is like on their ocean view, 10-acre facility known for cutting-edge recovery methods, a picturesque tranquil environment, and 5-star luxury amenities. But the tour also tells the tale of a typical client, “Ben,” whose career and self-esteem struggles have caused his life to spiral downward. “Ben” has tried and failed to get sober at other treatment centers only to find his way to Passages for a life-changing experience.

Before the existence of Passages, the majority of treatment centers used the 12 Step method of addiction treatment, which depends on the client declaring him or herself an addict or alcoholic for the rest of his or her life and using group therapy as a core source of recovery. This method of staying sober certainly works for some, but it does not work for everyone. In fact, many people are apprehensive of the 12 Step model and refuse to sit in meetings where they must declare themselves as addicts or alcoholics to move forward. For those who find this to be ineffective, there needs to be an alternative way of getting sober.

That’s where Passages Rehab Center comes in. In 2001, Passages introduced a new and exciting alternative to the 12 Step model of treatment with its luxurious facility in Malibu, California and then its second more affordable center in Ventura, California in 2009. And the people came. Why? They came because many people were ready for something different – something better. Passages introduced an entirely new way of looking at addiction, which is reflected in their addiction treatment program. They emphasize one-on-one therapy (instead of group meetings) and holistic treatment. But what really sets them apart from the rest is their belief that addiction is not a disease. Rather, it is a symptom of underlying conditions that are treated through various modes of therapy at their treatment centers, including individual counseling, marriage and family therapy, acupuncture, acupressure, hypnotherapy, life purpose counseling, spiritual counseling, and healthy living (yoga, physical fitness training, and equine therapy), among others.

Our program places a lot of importance on holistic treatment that empowers the client rather than breaking them down and making them feel powerless,” explains Prentiss. “I strongly feel that there is something to be said for a holistic approach to addiction. I’m not denying the relative successes of Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12 Step programs. I just think there’s something more than what AA has to offer.”

Truly the crème-de-la-crème of treatment centers, Passages Malibu and its sister facility, Passages Ventura, earned JCAHO (Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations) accreditation, which has only been given to 6% of the nation’s behavioral health treatment programs.

At Passages Malibu: “Addiction Ends Here™”

About Passages Malibu & Passages Ventura:

Founded by Chris Prentiss and Pax Prentiss, Passages Malibu opened in 2001 with its second location, Passages Ventura, opening in 2009. The two drug and alcohol abuse treatment centers offer an alternative to the 12-step/AA model of addiction treatment by taking a holistic approach with a program that focuses on the underlying issues of substance dependency, rather than suggesting that addiction is an incurable disease. Passages Malibu and Passages Ventura have earned the coveted JCAHO (Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations) accreditation, which has only been given to 6% of the nation’s behavioral health treatment programs. The co-founders are also authors of the acclaimed series of treatment books that include their groundbreaking flagship book, “The Alcoholism & Addiction Cure.” At Passages, we believe: Addiction Ends Here™. For general inquiries about treatment, contact: 866-233-1753

Addiction, Addiction Treatment Centers, Alcohol Addiction, Alcohol Rehab, Amphetamine Addiction, Amphetamines Withdrawal, Chemical Dependency, Cocaine Addiction, Crystal Meth Addiction, Dependency, Drug Rehab, Ecstasy Addiction, GHB Addiction, Heroin Addiction, Inpatient Alcohol Rehab, Inpatient Drug Rehab, Inpatient Rehab, Ketamine Addiction, LSD Addiction, Marijuana Addiction, Marijuana Dependency, Nicotine Addiction, Opiate Addiction, Passages Malibu, Prescription Drug Addiction, Psychedelic Mushrooms Addiction, Recovery, Rehab, Rehab Facilities, Rehab Programs, Relationships, Residential Treatment Facilities, Spirituality, Teen Addiction, Withdrawal

Worldwide Drug Abuse

Many of the articles we read and the studies we observe are discussing drug and alcohol abuse in the United States.  However, drug and alcohol abuse is a problem that is occurring all around the world, and has been an issue in numerous countries for centuries.

Research studies do show that specific drugs used vary from country to country and from region to region. Throughout the world, the main substance of abuse is alcohol, and the three main illegal drugs of abuse are marijuana, opiates (particularly heroin), and cocaine.  Drugs have been present in every culture throughout history, whether used for medical, religious, or recreational purposes.

The problem of drug abuse around the world has dramatically increased during the past 100 years, as advances in chemistry and science have allowed new drugs to be mass-produced and created synthetically from old sources.  Unfortunately, these new drugs that are refined and created synthetically are often more dangerous, powerful and addictive than any drugs in the past. While great advances have been made in the creation and use of drugs for medical purposes, drug use for recreation and pleasure has increased sharply, resulting in a much higher occurrence of addiction around the world.

 

Image via We Heart It 

Addiction, Addiction Treatment Centers, Alcohol Addiction, Alcohol Rehab, Amphetamine Addiction, Amphetamines Withdrawal, Chemical Dependency, Cocaine Addiction, Crystal Meth Addiction, Dependency, Drug Rehab, Ecstasy Addiction, GHB Addiction, Heroin Addiction, Inpatient Alcohol Rehab, Inpatient Drug Rehab, Inpatient Rehab, Ketamine Addiction, LSD Addiction, Marijuana Addiction, Marijuana Dependency, Nicotine Addiction, Opiate Addiction, Passages Malibu, Prescription Drug Addiction, Psychedelic Mushrooms Addiction, Rehab, Rehab Facilities, Rehab Programs, Residential Treatment Facilities, Withdrawal

Denial and Substance Abuse

Many people often hear the term “denial” or the phrase “being in denial” when discussing an individual with a substance abuse issue.  Many individuals who have been abusing drugs or alcohol for an extended period of time get very good at hiding and covering up their actions, and have a hard time admitting to themselves or their families the true extent of their usage.

In a recent study conducted by the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, millions Americans admitted to habitually smoking pot, drinking alcohol, snorting cocaine or taking prescription drugs, yet many of them were not completely honest about their level of use and many of them who met the criteria for needing treatment did not recognize that they have a problem. The study estimates that those “in denial” of a problem is close to 5 million, which is a much higher number than the people that actually seek and get professional treatment.  It seems as though there is a large and growing denial gap when it comes to drug abuse and dependency in our society.  Drug and alcohol abuse is often glorified and readily accepted in the media, which may in part add to the nation’s large issue with denial.  At Passages, we help our client come to terms with and be honest about their behaviors and help them get back to healthy, drug free lives.

 

Image via We Heart It

Prescription Drug Addiction

Ambien and Sleeping Pill Addiction

Addiction to Ambien and various other sleeping medications has drastically increased in recent years.  Ambien is a sedative-hypnotic drug, with effects similar to Valium or Xanax, that is frequently prescribed to people for a temporary solution for insomnia.

Although many physicians do frequently prescribe Ambien, they often frequently urge patients to seek other more permanent, long-term treatment for insomnia that lasts longer than the quick-fix of a sleeping pill.  Ambien does not actually heal insomnia, but rather it masks the problem, which is often caused by some other physical or mental problem and underlying condition that disrupts normal sleep patterns. Long-term use of Ambien can lead to physical or psychological dependency, eventually requiring drug detox and inpatient drug rehab.

Unfortunately, Ambien has several characteristics that make it potentially very addictive. Ambien has a quick onset, and individuals can use the drug to fall asleep, but typically do not have any after-effects the next morning.  Ambien can have dangerous side effects when taken in conjunction with other substances, especially with other central nervous system depressants and alcohol.  Individuals who continually take Ambien build up a physical tolerance, eventually increasing their doses and eventually leading to rebound insomnia if taken off the drug.  Unfortunately, Ambien is also frequently used in suicide attempts and attempts at heavy and unhealthy sedation.  If you or someone you know has a problem with Ambien or other sleep-inducing drugs, Passages can help.

 

Image via We Heart It

Addiction, Chemical Dependency, Dependency, Prescription Drug Addiction

Increasing Abuse of Prescription Drugs

Abuse of prescription painkillers in the United States increased 400 percent between 1998 and 2008, according to a study conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Unfortunately, this problem is not just isolated to a particular group; all ages, races, socioeconomic groups and genders are reporting increased usage. Nowadays, there are so many addictive painkillers, anti anxiety medications, mood relaxants, and various other drugs readily available. Sadly, the fact that these types of drugs are prescribed by a doctor often gives individuals the illusion of safety; they think that because their doctor is giving it to them it must be harmless, when in reality many of these drugs are extremely dangerous and addictive. We often see individuals who have no history of illegal drug abuse who become addicted to pain killers after surgery, an accident, and so on. Fortunately, we have many therapists on hand who are experienced in dealing with individuals addicted to prescription drugs, and we offer a safe and comfortable detox.

Prescription Drug Addiction

The Facts About Prescription Drug Addiction

Countless Americans have struggled with prescription drug abuse, and subsequent addiction. For some, prescription drug addiction begins with a legitimate prescription that becomes physically addictive due to length and amount of dosage. For others, the euphoria that certain prescription drugs provide provides an escape from negative self beliefs or buried emotional pain, causing an initial psychological dependency and an eventual full-blown physical addiction as use continues.

Facts About Prescription Drug Addiction

Often overlooked or minimized as a “softer” form of chemical dependency, prescription drug addiction can involve “doctor shopping,” street purchase, and even overdose as dependency increases. Here are just a few facts about prescription drug addiction that illustrate the scope of the epidemic.

  • Nearly 2.5 million Americans have used prescription drugs for purely recreational reasons.
  • Over 50 million people in the U.S. alone have abused prescription drugs at least once.
  • 46 percent of adults have used prescription drugs in the last month.
  • Over 70 percent of physician, hospital and emergency room visits end in medication prescription.
  • Seven percent of 8th graders and 10 percent of high school seniors use amphetamines without a prescription.
  • According to a Columbia University research study, 84 percent of online pharmacies do not require prescriptions to order medication.
  • The three most popular prescription drugs for recreational use are opioids, depressants, and stimulants.
  • Painkillers are the most popular abused prescription drugs, with tranquilizers and stimulants closely behind.
  • Teenagers between the ages of 12 to 17 are more likely to abuse prescription drugs.
  • Those living in Western and Southeastern states tend to have a higher likelihood of become prescription drug dependent.
  • Many prescription drugs are sold on the streets or given away to friends or family.
  • Girls have a greater likelihood than boys of becoming addicted to prescription drugs.
  • The most commonly abused prescription drugs among teenagers are OxyContin and Vicodin.
  • Teenagers are more likely than college upperclassmen to develop a prescription drug addiction.