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Passages Rehab

How to Know if You Need Addiction Rehab

By Jennifer McDougall

Many people who become dependent on drugs and alcohol to get through the day or night, don’t plan to end up in that condition. They may have started as a teenager or young adult, surrounded by peers and influences who lead them down the path that brought them to where they are now. It’s unlikely for a person to become addicted to drugs and alcohol intentionally. It usually happens over time. First, it seems like fun, and then the fun turns into trouble, adds complication to life, physical issues begin to arise, and the addiction entirely takes hold and works against you in every way possible. That is the situation many people experience, and what we want to tell you is that there is hope for positive changes to be made when the addicted person decides to get the help they need.

Signs You Need Rehab Now

  1. Your drug of choice has become a priority above and before anything else in your life
  2. Your physical and mental health is suffering due to your substance use
  3. You come up with every excuse to get high
  4. You have tried to quit on your own but have not been able to stay sober
  5. Your relationships have become strained
  6. You have been struggling at work or calling in sick because you’re hungover
  7. You continue to do reckless things under the influence only to wake up and regret everything in the morning
  8. You lie about how often you use
  9. You’ve experienced legal troubles due to drugs and alcohol
  10. You’re missing out on important obligations (meetings, anniversaries, birthdays, paying the bills on time, or not completing assignments on time)

At Passages Malibu and Passages Ventura, we understand that addiction is caused by four main reasons.

  1. A chemical imbalance
  2. Events of the past you have not reconciled
  3. Current conditions you can’t cope with
  4. Things you believe that aren’t true

It is common for a person who is addicted to drugs and alcohol to be in denial of having a problem or needing any help. In many cases, they refuse to go to treatment until they genuinely step back and see the situation for everything that it is. Usually, that requires an outside person such as an interventionalist to come in and talk to the individual calmly and soundly.

When relationships are falling apart, deadlines are no longer being met, responsibilities are not being handled, legally matters occur, and physical health is on the decline it should cause for a serious analysis of what is going on with that person and what needs to be done to help improve the overall quality of life for the individual struggling to stay afloat.

“We recognize that you’ve used substances to try to regain your lost balance, to try to feel the way you did before the need arose to use addictive drugs or alcohol. We know that you use substances to alter your mood, to cover up your sadness, to ease your heartbreak, to lighten your stress load, to blur your painful memories, to escape your hurtful reality, or to make your unbearable days or nights bearable.”
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

How to Repair the Damage of Alcohol Abuse

How to Repair the Damage of Alcohol Abuse

By Jennifer McDougall

Are you ready to make changes in your life to get on the right path to health and happiness? If so, you have come to the right place. Many people who have used and abused alcohol or other addictive drugs in the past know how damaging the effects can be on the body, mind, and spirit. At Passages, we take a holistic approach to treating and healing the underlying conditions causing a person to use and abuse drugs and alcohol.

Organs such as the brain, which contain a lot of water and need a lot of blood to function, are particularly vulnerable to the effects of alcohol. Alcohol makes the liver, which is the major organ that processes alcohol, work very hard. Delaying treatment for alcohol abuse can be life-threatening. It is very important that someone who is struggling with addiction to get help as soon as possible.

Since there is a wide range of problems that come with years of substance abuse related issues, including damage to vital organs, interpersonal relationships, and the inability to live a happy and stable life, waiting to get help can and oftentimes only makes matters much worse.

At Passages, we understand what it takes to repair and move on; to live a life free from addiction.

Upon your arrival at Passages Malibu, our nurses will help you get checked in and assess your detox needs. Your medical doctor will then design a customized detox program made specifically for you. During your detox, you will be personally attended to by a team of nurses as your body rids itself of toxic, addictive substances.

We use only the most effective methods and medications to safely bring you off the addictive drugs that your body has formed a dependency on. Our doctor is board certified in addiction medicine, meaning you will receive the most cutting-edge approach to detox. Throughout your detox, our nurses will regularly evaluate your progress and work closely with your medical doctor to coordinate your care.

Alcohol abuse is associated with numerous health issues, emotional problems, social problems, and psychological issues. While it may be difficult to undo all the damage brought on by alcohol abuse, it is possible to heal the body, mind, and spirit through a variety of holistic therapy options such as those available at Passages Addiction Treatment Centers. One of the most important aspects of reversing the damage of alcohol abuse is to address the cause, first and foremost so that moving forward we can help prevent future substance abuse related issues. The other thing we need to do is take a health and fitness evaluation to test your body for any liver and cardiovascular issues that need to be addressed.

For many people, they want to make up for the time the lost living a life that didn’t fulfill their needs and wreaked havoc on their social, physical, emotional, and psychological wellbeing. They want to improve the quality of their relationships, feel healthy, happy, and repair their careers and overall quality of life.

At Passages, we offer a complete 360-degree approach to healing so that every aspect of your life is given the opportunity to improve. The tools we teach and provide you with at Passages are based upon a unique and empowering non-12 Step philosophy that has helped change and save the lives of over twenty thousand people who have gone through our innovative treatment program. Here is a look at our variety of therapy methods.

Addiction Therapy at Passages Malibu
Addiction Therapy at Passages Malibu | Luxury Rehab

“How do you change what you believe when your experience has convinced you otherwise? By creating a new experience. The best way for you to get that new experience is to change your response to what happens. By the natural law of cause and effect, that new response will create new results, which you will then experience as a new reality. To reach the goal of happiness, act as though the following statement is already true: Everything that happens to me is the best thing that can happen to me.”
― Chris Prentiss

For nearly twenty years, Passages has been setting the standard with our revolutionary one-on-one holistic treatment programs. From the moment you check in to the moment you graduate you will experience the highest level of treatment innovations and healing techniques to eradicate addiction for good. Other treatment centers cannot match the level of service and expertise that Passages Malibu offers.

Passages Addiction Treatment Centers | Most Insurance is Accepted

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Accountability in Addiction Recovery | Passages Holistic Rehab

How to Have Accountability in Addiction Recovery

By Jennifer McDougall

“Most people do not really want freedom, because freedom involves responsibility, and most people are frightened of responsibility.” –   Sigmund Freud

Give a person freedom and see what they do with it. You can tell a lot about a person’s habits, beliefs, and priorities when you hand them freedom. This, of course, comes with great responsibility, especially for someone in addiction recovery.

Most people who have struggled with substance abuse related issues know how important it is to have someone help them be accountable for their actions so that they can stay on the right path. Accountability helps us reach our goals and be the successful individual we hope and work hard to be. Knowing that you have to show up for that meeting or appointment in the morning will help you be less tempted to get in trouble the night before. You will most likely be more motivated to have a relaxing, drug, and alcohol-free evening so you can wake up and feel healthy and energized in the morning.

For many people in recovery, the fear of going back to old ways, and unhealthy habits keep them pushing forward to grow and develop new and improved lifestyle choices they can feel happy about. Having a carefully laid out course of action to stay accountable is the best way to be clear and focused on your sobriety. Here are 7 helpful tips.

  1. Let your friends and family know about your sobriety.
  2. Find an accountability partner to check in with as often as you need.
  3. Keep a physical and mental list of what you have to lose.
  4. Stay closely connected to those who support your sobriety.
  5. Be consistent in your routine and responsibilities.
  6. Set weekly and daily goals for yourself and cross them off as you go.
  7. Schedule social, fitness, and business appointments for the morning to keep you from being tempted to stray off course in the evening hours.
Call (888) 397-0112 today. Most insurance is accepted.

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Passages Malibu Addiction Treatment Philosophy
Passages Malibu Addiction Treatment Philosophy
Concerns Grow for Alcohol Abuse During Coronavirus Lockdown

Concerns Grow for Alcohol Abuse During Coronavirus Lockdown

By Jennifer McDougall

While many people are stuck at home, finding themselves bored, with more time on their hands than they know what to do with, the number of people abusing drugs and alcohol is on the rise. According to Nielsen data, alcohol sales have risen 55 percent in the week ending March 21.

“U.S. sales of alcoholic beverages rose 55% in the week ending March 21, according to market research firm Nielsen. Spirits like tequila, gin and pre-mixed cocktails led the way, with sales jumping 75% compared to the same period last year. Wine sales were up 66% while beer sales rose 42%. And online sales far outpaced in-store sales.” – AP News

Evidently liquor stores are considered essential businesses in the United States, making buying alcohol convenient and available during this time of crisis. The trouble is that as more people flock to the liquor stores and back home to indulge in toxic self-soothing remedies to cope with the current pandemic, not only are these people exposing themselves to public places during a time where the majority of us should be staying home, the probability of them becoming dependant on substances increases dramatically. Fortunately, there are many resources for people who are struggling with drug and alcohol dependencies, such as here at Passages Addiction Treatment Centers.

Mental health is also a big concern for people in quarantine and struggling to stay calm with productive activities to help pass the time. More people than probably ever before are having a difficult time lowering feelings of stress and anxiety, causing them to crave substances to numb the pain and discomfort.

A lack of meaningful connections such as support from those who share common interests as you who are there for you to lean on and care about you causes a sense of disconnect during this time of quarantine. What we need to embrace most of all right now is staying connected with one another through text messaging, video chatting, and social media so that we can maintain and a healthy level of connectivity to each other. When people feel lonely or withdrawn from society, they tend to move towards drugs and alcohol as a way to cope with the pain of their feeling of not being part of the community or a strong support system.

At Passages Malibu, we offer a true alternative to 12-step addiction rehab. We have been providing holistic therapy for people seeking a non-disease model, non-AA, cutting-edge treatment since 2001.

Our alternative treatment program is designed to completely heal all aspects of your life damaged by addiction, including your physical health, your professional & personal relationships, your self-esteem, and more. No two programs are alike, and each alternative treatment plan is customized for you, by you, with your specific situation in mind.

At Passages Malibu, you can expect the very best from our alternative approach to addiction treatment:

  • We will truly represent the definition of holistic treatment, which means we heal the entire person, from the inside out, through a variety of different methods that address mental, physical, and spiritual health.
  • We will treat each client with respect and dignity, and we will never employ punitive treatment methods.
  • We believe that every person is dealing with unique circumstances, and therefore we make every treatment plan unique and do not adhere to the one-size-fits-all group approach.
  • We will focus on healing the underlying issues that are causing you to use drugs or alcohol, and we acknowledge that drug or alcohol abuse is a symptom of a larger underlying problem.
  • We will never make you declare yourself powerless with a disease.
  • We are accredited by the Joint Commission (JCAHO) and licensed by the State of California to offer drug and alcohol treatment, and we utilize diverse therapeutic disciplines from across the world in our program.

What sets Passages apart is that we thoroughly address and treat every aspect of dependency. Our alternative approach to drug and alcohol rehabilitation is ultimately very straightforward: We do not believe that you are powerless against addiction, and we emphasize healing instead of labeling.

Don’t live the rest of your life one day at a time – live fully, peacefully, and free from addiction with the help of our alternative addiction treatment program.

Concerns Grow Over Alcohol Abuse During Coronavirus Lockdown

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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7 Ways to Create Your Personal Philosophy

7 Ways to Create Your Personal Philosophy

By Jennifer McDougall

“A strong personal philosophy does more than sustain us through the tragedies of life. It also stains us daily in everything we think and do. It gives us optimism and hope.”
― Chris Prentiss, Zen and the Art of Happiness

When you think about the way you view the world, what you value, your own moral compass, and perspective, what do you see? Creating a personal philosophy helps guide us into the direction that is aligned with our core principles. How you react and respond to situations that happen to and around you is part of your personal philosophy.

  1. Introspection. Look within your soul to discover a new light of clarity that gives you hope and makes you feel empowered.
  2. Study other philosophies such as religion and spiritual beliefs.
  3. Discuss your values and core beliefs with other people.
  4. Practice making choices that are aligned with your beliefs.
  5. Reframe your beliefs so they work for you and not against you.
  6. Find a therapist, life coach, or mentor that can help guide and support you in creating and practicing your personal philosophy.
  7. Be patient. Allow your personal philosophy to evolve and develop over time through various experiences and enlightenment.

The reason it’s important to have a strong personal philosophy is that it helps us make decisions and live an authentic life where you can be true to yourself and honest with others you interact with.

10 Questions to Ask Yourself

  1. What is the purpose or meaning of your life? What are you most passionate about? What do you value the most in life?
  2. Which beliefs resonate with you and which ones do not?
  3. What do you want to contribute to the world? What would you like your legacy to be? What are the most important things for you to accomplish in your life?
  4. What type of working, living, and social environments are best suitable for achieving your goals?
  5. What physical and mental state should you aim to reach in order to achieve your goals and be successful?
  6. What do you need every day to live a life that honors your morals, values, and goals?
  7. What do you need to release from your life or daily habits to achieve your goals and live a life you feel proud of?
  8. What type of music, art, and literature resonate best with you?
  9. How do you view conflicts when they arise? In what way do you approach issues in your life?
  10. What type of attitude do you have in the general theme of your life?

“Don’t Just

Don’t just learn, experience.
Don’t just read, absorb.
Don’t just change, transform.
Don’t just relate, advocate.
Don’t just promise, prove.
Don’t just criticize, encourage.
Don’t just think, ponder.
Don’t just take, give.
Don’t just see, feel.
Don’t just dream, do.
Don’t just hear, listen.
Don’t just talk, act.
Don’t just tell, show.
Don’t just exist, live.”
― Roy T. Bennett, The Light in the Heart

7 Ways to Create Your Personal Philosophy

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

How to Identify and Heal the Root Cause of Addiction

How to Identify and Heal the Root Cause of Addiction

By Jennifer McDougall

“At the bottom of every person’s dependency, there is always pain, Discovering the pain and healing it is an essential step in ending dependency.”
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure

If you are someone who has been struggling with addiction and want to end the cycle and start living a life you’re proud of, you’ve come to the right place. At Passages, we understand how difficult it is to break free from substance abuse-related issues. Our founders, Chris and Pax Prentiss experienced it first hand when Pax as struggling with an addiction to alcohol, cocaine, and heroin. His father, Chris, fought long and hard to do whatever it took to save his son’s life. It was not until Pax discovered WHY he was using and then began applying holistic therapy methods such as the ones utilized at Passages, to finally end the cycle of his addiction and substance-abuse related problems.

At the core of any addiction is a root cause. Pinpointing that cause is a significant part of the healing process. Many people have unresolved trauma from their childhood. We work with clients from all walks of life that come to us from all over the world and the most common reason people use drugs and alcohol is that they are experiencing some sort of pain or discomfort in their life.

At Passages Malibu, we focus on healing the underlying conditions that are causing you to use drugs and alcohol. We do this by utilizing a highly individualized treatment program with therapists who are experienced in healing the underlying causes of addiction. We do not use the 12-Step program because we believe that it teaches a philosophy that is detrimental to healing and can lead to relapse. Our holistic one-on-one approach is far superior to the 12-Step program and offers state-of-the-art services that will keep you engaged and enthusiastic about healing. During treatment, you will feel empowered, instead of powerless. We do not label you an addict or alcoholic nor do we believe that you have a disease. We have found that damaging labels, such as addict and alcoholic, rob you of your true identity.

It’s the treatment philosophy at Passages that sets us apart from all other rehab centers in the world. We choose to empower you and heal your underlying conditions, rather than label you an addict and tell you that you have a disease.

At Passages Addiction Treatment Centers, we believe that addiction is caused by four specific underlying conditions. If you’re abusing drugs and alcohol, you have at least one of these underlying conditions present which needs to be healed in order to achieve permanent sobriety. Please look at the four possible underlying conditions and see if you are aware of which one you have (or if you have more than one).

1. A Chemical
Imbalance

2. Events of the past you
have not reconciled

3. Current conditions
you can’t cope with

4. Things you believe
that aren’t true

Making yourself aware of how you feel when you begin to crave drugs or alcohol is a good indicator or what is motivating your choices and behavior. Next time you have an urge, pay attention to your surroundings, what was said, what just happened that triggered you and then you can begin to take better control of the problem at hand and begin healing every aspect of the substance abuse related issues in your life that have been holding you back from living your best, most true and authentic life that you deserve.

www.PassagesMalibu.com

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

The Four Causes of Addiction

The Four Causes to Addiction

There are only four causes of all addiction. It may seem as if there are hundreds, but there are only four.  You have quit many times, only to relapse, even if there were long periods of sobriety. What draws you inexorably back is the unresolved conditions produced by one or more of the four causes listed below. As you read the list of examples, write down the numbers of the ones that apply to you. When you are finished, email the numbers to us: passages@evaluation.com  Include your contact information and we will get back to you promptly and tell you what we can do to help end your addiction. It is certain you have an unresolved Cause. It is nearly certain you have forgotten the original cause because of the pain, the shame, the sadness or the hurt you experienced when you remembered it when it was still fresh. Or you may even remember it, but do not credit it with causing and keeping alive your current addiction. You may have examples we haven’t listed; add those to your list. Regarding neurotransmitter imbalance, there’s no need to list it as everyone who has an addiction to drugs, including alcohol, has a neurotransmitter imbalance.

The Four Broad Categories

1A Neurotransmitter imbalance

       2B Events of the past you have not been able to reconcile.

       3C Current conditions you can’t cope with.

4D Things you believe that aren’t true.

A Brief Description of The Four Causes

Cause 1A

1A Neurotransmitter imbalance. In the first 3 ½ years after we opened Passages, everyone who came was given an electroencephalograph exam (EEG). The psychiatrist who administered the EEG testing is one of the foremost psychiatrists in EEG testing. Each client had eight electrodes placed on the top of his or her head to read electrical impulses from the surface of their brain. We read their brain waves for fifteen minutes, then took the quietest ten seconds, when the brain was at its most restful state, and processed it through our computer where we had the baseline from New York University. There was not one person whose brain wave patterns were within the normal range. We discovered that those people who had fast brain wave patterns were using drugs marijuana, opiates and alcohol in an attempt to slow themselves down and feel normal. Those who had slow brain wave patterns were using speed drugs: cocaine, Adderall, methamphetamine, Ritalin, and caffeine. Everyone was seeking a drug that made them feel normal or balanced.

Cause 2B

Events of the past you haven’t been able to reconcile. Life brings us challenges. Some of the challenges are painful, demoralizing, identity crushing, unbearable, humiliating, shameful, depressing, mentally disturbing and they all cause trauma that can live in our brain forever causing us great pain both mental and physical. If the trauma and pain are substantial enough, the memories are stamped indelibly on our brain and in some cases, in our muscle tissue. Many years may pass, but the memories are still there, buried in your subconscious, hurting all your days. One of the most beneficial attributes of a human being is the ability to forget. Whenever the images of the painful trauma emerge, we block it in an attempt to ease the pain. After a while, the event is buried. The memory of it is still there, but our recall system has shut it down from everyday consciousness; yet it is still there, subliminally causing us to medicate ourselves with drugs and alcohol particularly when the same traumatic feeling you experienced during the original trauma are felt again, even though they may not trigger a memory of the original event.  Left to continue its disruptive action, we either suffer or medicate the pain away, unaware of the cause. As you read the examples, write down the numbers of the ones that apply to you and email them to us at

  • B1 Sexually Abused at any time or multiple times.
  • B2 Physically abused as a child
  • B3 Physically abused at any time
  • B4 Victim of bullying
  • Verbal abuse – being yelled at, called names
  • Emotional Abuse – is defined as “stupid” or “wrong”
  • Shamed for being shy
  • Shamed for Self-Expression
  • Shamed for your sexuality
  • Narcissistic abuse
  • Seeing violence occur in your home even if you did not experience it
  • Being introduced to porn or snuff films at a young age by a parent or sibling or babysitter
  • Made to feel like a failure i.e. “You’ll never amount to anything.”
  • Being told they were not wanted “I wish I had an abortion”
  • “I wanted a girl.”
  • “I wanted a boy.”
  • Being told you ruined your parents’ lives
  • Being criticized for your appearance – “too fat, too thin, too ugly, pimples, a deformity.”
  • Being raised in a cult with frightening rituals and practices
  • Overly critical parents
  • Being a victim of parent ‘kidnapping” – one parent kept you from the other
    • Ignored by family
    • Ignored by siblings
    • Abandoned by a parent or parents as a child
    • No listened to or understood
    • Emotionally unavailable parents
    • Made to feel unsafe
    • Not receiving protection from the non-abusive parent
    • Emotionally disconnected parents/family
    • Being raised by a mentally ill parent
    • Absentee Parents
    • Absence of positive role models
    • Sent away to live somewhere else
    • Lack of approval.
    • Not allowed to pursue your interests
    • Not allowed to pursue one’s choice in education or career
    • Severe poverty and conditions
    • Being lost in a large family
    • Lack of affection from parents and siblings
  • Parent’s Divorce
  • Family Addiction
  • Being the scapegoat in your Family
  • Too strict parents
  • Too lenient parents
  • incest
  • No structure in your family
  • Sibling rivalry
  • Not measuring up to family expectations
  • Being made to act as the parent to the parent instead of being allowed to be a child
  • Infantilized by Parents – not allowed to grow up
  • Unresolved grief over the death of a parent
  • Unresolved grief over the death of a sibling
  • A single parent with multiple sexual partners
  • Abuse by a stepmother
  • Abuse by a stepfather
  • Death of a primary caregiver when you were a child
  • Constant Conflict between parents or family members
  • You were adopted
  • Uprooted, frequent relocations
  • Having a long-term illness as a child
  • Loss of a job
  • Unfair judgment put on you.
  • Kept back a grade or multiple grades in school
  • Unfair treatment in school
  • Missed opportunity
  • Passed over for promotion
  • Filing for bankruptcy
  • Failed business
  • Early success and accomplishments, then failure
  • Loss of health
  • Loss of a close relationship
  • Loss of reputation
  • Loss of purpose
  • Loss of dreams
  • Moving to a new area
  • Unhappy marriage (the ideal not being fulfilled)
  • Childbirth problems
  • Adoption
  • Empty Nest (children moved away)
  • Diagnosed with a learning disability
  • Unable to achieve education
  • mid-life crisis
  • Aging process
  • Losing identity/sense of self to being a wife and mother
  • Severe accidents
  • Suicide (by loved one or attempt on one’s own life)
  • Death of loved one
  • Abortion
  • Victim of a Crime of Violence
  • Victim of a natural disaster
  • Divorce
  • Betrayal
  • Scandal, public humiliation
  • Loss of custody of children
  • Death of a child
  • Degenerative illness
  • Injury or disabled
  • War experience
  • Chronic pain
  • Being brought up in the foster care system
  • Being robbed or taken advantage of by a friend or family member
  • Loss of a family pet

3C

Current conditions you can’t cope with.  We all experience stress in one form or another. When stress reaches a level we can’t tolerate, instead of working on ways to reduce the stress either by eliminating the cause or moderating it with calming techniques, we turn to medications for relief. Here are some of the conditions:

  • C1 Unbearable physical pain from a car accident, workplace accident, or a bad fall
  • C2 An illness such a Chron’s Disease, hyper or hypothyroid, HIV, or liver cirrhosis which causes uncomfortable symptoms like mood swings, insomnia, anxiety, or depression.
  • C3 Recent diagnoses with a mental illness
  • C4 Body dysmorphia (Imagined physical defects)
  • Lack of coping strategies
  • A home environment not supportive
  • Passive suicidal ideation
  • Cannot manage life emotionally
  • Lack of life purpose
  • Lacks insight – poor insight into anger or anxiety
  • Balance of work, life, play
  • Lack of support
  • Not taking responsibility
  • being out of touch with self and others
  • Interpersonal conflict and stress
  • Absence of flexibility, difficulties with change
  • Difficulties in regulating emotions
  • Difficulty accepting reality as it is
  • OCD-Having obsessive thoughts
  • Detachment – all the aforementioned such as childhood abuse, trauma, or loss, lack of love can cause us to detach as a survival mechanism. This behavior can stay with us throughout our entire lives and can go unrecognized for many years.
  • in an unhealthy relationship or relationships
  • spouse/family member still using drugs or alcohol
  • returning to the same unhealthy environment after treatment
  • Stress from returning to work or starting a new job
  • Loved one passing away
  • lack of coping skills
  • feelings of unacceptance
  • feelings of low worth and low self- esteem
  • Falling away from support or whatever helps them from not relapsing; i.e. church supportive friends, exercising)
  • Lack of focus,
  • mental noise; scattered thoughts of no consequence.
  • struggling with decision making, overthinking, can’t make up their mind, uncertainty confusion about how to move forward and which path to choose,
  • unable to commit, procrastination.
  • Self-shame
  • Fear of not being good enough.
  • Fear of being alone,
  • Fear of dying,
  • fear of rejection
  • Fear of the future
  • Lack of self-trust or belief, not fitting in with family’s conditions
  • Doesn’t like job/career
  • Self-critical/judgmental
  • Negative self-talk
  • Feeling lost
  • Purposeless
  • Unhappy with Physical self-image
  • Can’t accept the aging process
  • Regrets or angry at their past
  • Hyper Sensitive to energy due to their childhood traumas
  • Lack of spirituality
  • Being disappointed with yourself for not achieving your life’s goals
  • No support system
  • Toxic environment
  • One I hear of frequently changes in life role- having to take on care of aging parents, having older children return home, etc. frequently it also has to do with forcing bad relationships to work (whether these are romantic, friendship, or family) and failing to enact healthy boundaries.
  • Change in work status (up or down) some promotions cause people to feel they may not deserve the promotion and self-sabotage, conversely being demoted, laid off, or outright fired is devastating to self-esteem.
  • Change of residence. moving cities can unbalance someone. Change of countries, even change of homes can cause one to feel unbalanced for a time triggering abuse.
  • Divorce or ending a relationship. Or simply a development of conflict within the relationship.  Death of a family member. Death of a child.  Abortion.
  • Empty nest syndrome I am seeing this a lot more recently where the primary caretaker usually the mother lacks life purpose after the children are grown and starts drinking a lot more
  • Being in the “sandwich” between aging parents and the needs of their children. 
  • Relationships are a very common one, marriages, family, judgment from both
  • High-stress jobs/careers or unhappy with a job/career.
  • Being unable to identify their path in life, finding purpose, and joy.
  • I am part of my family business and they want me to be something I am not.
  • My job is very stressful, I work nonstop many hours per day. 
  • I cannot find my place in this society. I feel out of it
  • My head does not stop. I have thousands of thoughts.
  • lack of lifestyle and balance
  • legal issues
  • chronic pain
  • unemployment
  • not feeling financially stable and still dependent on family or spouse
  • unable to rely on family or spouse because they have passed away or abandoned me
  • insomnia
  • Out of work
  • Financial worries
  • Loneliness
  • Boredom
  • Bad marriage
  • Bad relationships
  • Problems with children
  • Special needs children
  • A general feeling of dissatisfaction with life
  • Feeling stuck
  • Custody battles
  • Co-parenting issues
  • Aging parents requiring care
  • Doubting their sexuality
  • Unsure whether to come out or not
  • In a physically abusive relationship
  • Anxious disorder
  • Medical diagnosis
  • Aging process
  • Unexpected natural disasters
  • Lack of a rewarding social circle
  • Lack of family support
  • Raising a child
  • Being forced to be a part of the family business instead of pursuing their own dreams
  • Working non-stop many hours per day
  • Can’t find their place in society
  • Racing mind, thoughts do not stop
  • Divorce or failing marriage
  • Business decline or bankruptcy
  • Return of older children to the home
  • Lack of intimacy in marriage
  • The difference in parenting styles leading to conflict
  • Poor health
  • Fertility problems
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Menopause
  • School pressures
  • Work/Life balance
  • Lack of friends
  • Spouse’s physical, mental, health issues
  • Raising a special needs child
  • Dealing with teenage/adult children’s own drug or alcohol abuse
  • Adult children being financially dependent and the stress that comes with
  • Raising grandchildren
  • Caring for elderly parents
  • Dealing with and treating an eating disorder
  • General dysfunctional family dynamics
  • Affairs
  • Partners who abuse
  • Conflict with family members
  • Homelessness
  • Isolation
  • Lack of purpose
  • Physical pain
  • Phobias
  • Undiagnosed mental illness
  • Probation/jail time
  • Failing business
  • Failing marriage
  • Unresolved issues in a multi-generational family business
  • Loss from natural disasters
  • Death of a family member or loved one
  • Delabializing illness
  • Diet
  • Inability to control their finances or budget
  • Children with disabilities
  • Lack of job skills
  • Lack of education
  • Lack of self-sufficiency
  • Numerous attempts in treatment or to get sober
  • Standard of living
  • Poor tolerance for discomfort
  • Career dissatisfaction
  • Failing mental capacity as they age
  • Lack of awareness of personal beliefs
  • Dominant family member

4D

Things we believe that aren’t true. What we believe to be true about the world in which we live and about ourselves May not be what is actually true. Some of it we learn from parents, some from teachers or friends or things we read or see in the media. What we believe to be true shapes our actions, our thoughts and indeed our very lives. Here are some examples:

  • D1 I am worthless
    • D2 I am a disappointment
    • D3 I will never be free of my drug of choice
    • D4 One week of treatment and I am ready to go home
    • I can still drink socially or use marijuana without leading to a relapse
    • I am cursed
    • I have done something wrong in past lives
    • I have no control
    • I am too dumb to learn new skills
    • Life is not worth trying
    • My teacher/ mother/ father/ pastor/ priest said I would never amount to anything
    • It’s genetic and out of my control
    • Anger. Much of the time. Unreasonable anger. Quick to anger. Uncontrollable anger.
    • “Not being honest about the treatment they need”
    • I can go on vacation and drink or use and not have it affect me
    • Remembering when using was “fun” in the beginning and only romanticizing it
    • Judgments from family members
    • “I’m not good enough”
    • “No one cares about me”
    • “I don’t deserve to be loved “
    • “I don’t deserve anything good in my life because I hurt so many people”
    • “I’m a failure”
    • “I don’t believe I can change”
    • “Staying sober is impossible”
    • “Being sober is boring”
    • These are frequently inherited or misinterpreted messages from childhood, ex: your sister was the smart one, no one expects much from you, you’ll never succeed because of x, y, or z
    • A belief that the person is entitled to a life free from pain and discomfort. (we are sold this on TV “ask your Dr. if this drug is right for you.
    • The belief that they are damaged goods. essentially tragically flawed, like “I’m an alcoholic.” 
    • The belief that they cannot change
    • The belief that they are trapped by obligation or circumstances
    • The belief that their life has no meaning.
    • Spiritual emptiness
    • Due to most past trauma, a lot of clients believe they are in fact worthless, this is very common with addiction.
    • The other big one, of course, is the incurable disease theory…the shame and guilt of it cause most clients to put off seeking help sooner. 
    • I am not good enough
    • I am not worthy enough,
    • I am not capable enough to go through this
    • The world is unsafe, and no one is to be trusted
    • The only way to deal with my emotions is to numb them with alcohol and drugs
    • Alcohol/drugs are a part of my identity and the only way I fit in
    • I will never live up to expectations
    • Everything is my fault
    • I was abused because I deserved it
    • I am unlovable
    • I’ve made so many mistakes, I will never be able to repair them
    • I will never succeed
    • I am not pretty enough, good enough, smart enough
    • I am helpless
    • I am powerless
    • I am alone
    • I will never be happy
    • The only way to deal with pain is drugs
    • My situation will never improve
    • I am not worth the expense of treatment
    • I am unforgivable
    • I can only get sober through will power and self-determination
    • I am owed something (sense of entitlement)
    • The whole world is against me
    • Drugs and alcohol give me the energy to get things done
    • Getting wasted is a rite of passage
    • I don’t have the opportunities that others have
    • I don’t deserve happiness
    • I am stupid
    • I have been using for as long as I can remember so I don’t think I can live life without it
    • No One expects much from me
    • I won’t ever have fun again if I’m sober
    • Taking care of myself is selfish
    • I’m too old to change
    • People won’t like me if I’m sober
    • I will always need medications for pain/anxiety
    • I won’t ever be happy
    • I can’t do it
    • I can’t survive without this relationship
    • I need extreme stimulation
    • I perform better on drugs
    • My feelings are facts
    • My value comes from the approval of others
    • It feels normal to live in chaos
    • It is not going to happen to me (negative consequences)
    • It is not me but everyone else who has the issues
    • It is in my genetic background to be an addict
    • I have ADHD and cocaine helps me focus
    • I have anxiety and it can only be managed with Xanax
    • 1 month of treatment and I’m ready
    • Nothing matters anymore
    • My addiction is a disease that is incurable
    • I am no longer able to change or grow as a person
    • I need to be smarter/more successful/better than I am
    • Refusing to engage in the world keeps me safe
    • I have already ruined my life and relationships, so I can’t stop now
    • Drugs and alcohol give me the warmth and comfort I can’t get anywhere else
    • I will never find love and acceptance from people who don’t use
    • There are no consequences to using
    • I can safely use
    • My talent is based on my substance abuse

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Effects of Drugs and Alcohol on the Brain

Effects of Drugs and Alcohol on the Brain

Drugs and alcohol are made of a variety of harmful chemicals that have many troubling effects on the body and brain. When a person consumes drugs and alcohol, chemicals make their way to the brain impacting how a person feels, thinks, and behaves. When someone is under the influence of drugs and alcohol, they tend to overreact in situations, create unnecessary drama, suppress stress, become dehydrated, neglect responsibilities, end up with vitamin deficiencies and have incoherent conversations.

Drugs are linked to a wide variety of effects on the brain specifically, including the following.

Impaired Short and Long Term Memory

It doesn’t take much for harmful and poisonous chemicals found in cocaine, alcohol, and, Xanax, just to name a few. The more you take drugs, the more impact it will cause. Substance abuse is proven as a cause of short and long term memory loss. A person who is intoxicated or high may experience a complete loss of memory the day or night before while using drugs and alcohol. This can be scary for anyone who may wake up and have little to no recollection as to what happened, or what was said during the time of being intoxicated. It certainly never makes for a good impression when socializing with other people not to mention the anxiety and panic that’s to come due to moral regret, physical aches, and pains, and fear of what’s to come from the choices made while under the influence.

Decision Making Process

Drug and alcohol make it difficult to think clearly and make smart choices. They make the user feel brave and a bit invincible; a misleading side effect of drugs and alcohol causing a person to act in such a way that is not authentic with who they truly are. It is more likely that the user will end up making poor decisions that oftentimes lead to dangerous and harmful situations that are found to be regrettable later. Those under the influence of drugs and alcohol are likely to experience balance problems, blurry vision, and slow reflexes.

Poor Judgement and Mood Disorders Including Anxiety and Depression

Since alcohol is a depressant that leads to relaxation, it slows down the user’s reaction time leading to loss of physical coordination, poor judgment, and sleepiness. A mood disorder is one of the effects of longer substance abuse. The frontal lobe is specifically responsible for reasoning and judgment.

Inability to learn

Drugs and alcohol interfere with the normal traffic pattern that neurotransmitters use. Chemical structures in drugs normally imitate and fool receptors locking and altering activities of the nerve cells. The alteration can cause neuro messages to go in the wrong direction and can also reset how the brain reacts, processes and retains information as well as effects the way you learn, think, focus, and remember. Other issues caused by substance abuse include disruption of nutrients that are needed by brain tissue, cause of killing brain cells including neurotransmitter receptors and the deprivation of oxygen to brain tissue.

Our brains are wired to help us repeat experiences that specifically make us feel good, the pleasure sensors specifically. Addictive drugs and alcohol target the reward system of the brain. Chemical dopamine goes into the brain and triggers a feeling of pleasure. That’s why many people use and abuse drugs and alcohol when coping with difficult issues in life such as grief, stress, loneliness, or boredom. They use addictive substances to escape the pain (current conditions causing discomfort or trouble), a chemical imbalance, unresolved issues from the past, or untrue beliefs they continue to tell themselves.

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

How to Practice Self-Control

How to Practice Self-Control

By Jennifer McDougall

“Everybody in the world is seeking happiness—and there is one sure way to find it. That is by controlling your thoughts. Happiness doesn’t depend on outward conditions. It depends on inner conditions.”
― Dale Carnegie

  1. Know your weaknesses and monitor them as soon as you are triggered to act on them so you can turn away and make better choices
  2. Strengthen your self-discipline by breaking free from procrastination habits and adopt an “I can and I will” attitude
  3. Get rid of all and any temptations (junk food, alcohol, cigarettes, toxic friends or family members, distractions, etc.)
  4. Practice healthy habits such as eating a balanced diet and working out
  5. Set goals and take action rather than making excuses
  6. Check-in with yourself often with daily meditation, deep breathing exercises and journaling
  7. Surround yourself with positive influences
  8. Activate a strong sense of confidence by taking better care of yourself
  9. Be lead by your own purpose and not under the control of others
  10. Don’t be afraid to say “No” Either people will respect your boundaries or they won’t, the ones that don’t are people you don’t need in your life

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Why Choose Passages Rehab?

Why Choose Passages Addiction Rehab Center

by Jennifer McDougall

What sets Passages apart from all other treatment centers? One of the most key elements of Passages is the quality of care and level of expertise in the field of holistic addiction treatment. Since 2001, Passages has been the leader in the addiction treatment industry. There have been over twenty thousand people who have come directly to Passages to end their battle with addiction; from all over the world.

People just like you. People who have read our website and who have seen the commercials on television. People of all walks of life, religion, cultures, race, and ethnicity have embraced the healing power of treatment at Passages.

Passages Addiction Treatment - Malibu Rehab
Passages Addiction Treatment – Malibu Rehab

What makes Passages different than most other treatment centers is the unique philosophy that we do not believe addiction to be a disease. Instead, Passages believes there are four main causes of addiction. 

  1. Chemical imbalance
  2. Events of the past that have not been reconciled
  3. Current conditions you can’t cope with
  4. Things you believe that are not true

As a client at Passages Addiction Treatment Centers, you will be under the care of professional doctors, and licensed therapists that are trained to help you discover and heal the underlying conditions driving your addiction, so that you can finally be free– without dependency related issues. 

” I can’t praise Passages enough. The services provided to my son were exactly what he needed and he continues to benefit. He went in February 2015 and stayed about six weeks. My insurance paid for most of it and the staff, I believe, bent over backward to help me pay my part of the bill. I am not of the elite, high-income population but rather low-income living paycheck to paycheck (if that). They have been kind, patient and willing to work with me over and over again. I would (and will) pay them anything they want because of their commitment to my son and his long-term recovery. I’ve found them fair each step of the way and I believe they care more about my son’s success than money.” – Cindy C. 

Passages is JCAHO accredited, which only 6% of rehabs have. We also accept most types of private insurance and 55-70 hours of one-on-one therapy per client each month. Our nursing staff is on site 24/7 to ensure your safety, comfort, and security. 

The programs at Passages are 30-90 days. We also offer outpatient rehab at Passages Beverlywood, Passages Ventura, and Passages Venice. We have a beautiful and luxurious sober living home on the beach in Santa Monica as well. 

While most treatment centers offer a traditional approach to treating addiction, Passages stands out by offering more one-on-one therapy sessions than most other places. We have luxurious grounds and amenities to enjoy as you recover. There are two pools, two Jacuzzi, a tennis court, basketball hoop, world-class chefs, cleaning services, ocean views, beach access, and 16 alternative therapy methods. 

  1. Acupressure and Massage
  2. Acupuncture
  3. Adventure Therapy
  4. Art Therapy
  5. Blood Chemistry Analysis
  6. Chemical Dependency Counseling
  7. Continuing Care
  8. Hypnotherapy
  9. Marriage and Family Therapy
  10. Meditation Therapy
  11. Physical Fitness
  12. Psychotherapy
  13. Sound Therapy
  14. Spiritual Counseling
  15. Tai Chi
  16. Yoga

No two days are the same at Passages. You do not have to be worried about feeling bored or homesick. You will be in good hands with us as we want to help you become free of substance abuse issues, and live the life you have always imagined. 

Passages Malibu

Recommended Reading: The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure by Chris and Pax Prentiss (Co-Founders of Passages Addiction Treatment Centers) 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Diet, Nutrition, and Addiction Recovery | Passages Rehab Centers

Diet, Nutrition, and Addiction Recovery

By Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC

“He who takes medicine and neglects to diet wastes the skill of his doctors.”

-Chinese Proverb

What is the connection between diet, nutrition, and addiction? Each has a direct effect on our brain chemistry, our mood, and our physique. Maintaining a nourishing diet and balanced lifestyle has a positive impact on all aspects of one’s life. The physical, cognitive, and emotional benefits of taking care of one’s mind and body by practicing healthy eating habits are widely known, but this is especially crucial in the detox phase.

Plato, the Greek philosopher, once stated: “The part can never be well unless the whole is well.” In other words, it is only when you treat the whole person, that you fully address the problem. The same can be said for working with those who suffer from substance use and addiction. Medical research indicates that approaching one’s illness holistically lends itself to faster healing and reduced complications in future health, all with less use of medication. Eating a variety of foods ensures you get all the calories, proteins, vitamins, and minerals you need. In order to heal properly, it is important to eat the right foods. When working with a dietician, one can follow simple suggestions for “plate mapping” their meal to include the necessary portion of different foods (The Cleveland Clinic).

Nutrition counseling paired with physical fitness has shown to have remarkable results, helping you maintain a healthy, balanced, and sober existence. Working with counselors at Passages Malibu making changes to your exercise routine and diet will allow you to not only appreciate the difference in your physical appearance, but you will also notice an increase in energy, confidence, and self-esteem.

Resources:

The Cleveland Clinic. Nutrition Guidelines to Improve Wound Healing.

At Passages Addiction Treatment Centers, our philosophy offers a genuine solution to end your addiction. You deserve something different. Something better. Something that works. Call now to learn more about our addiction treatment modalities and treatment programs (888) 920-8849.

 

Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC is an educator, published researcher, and social media consultant. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC) (e-therapy) and Suicide Prevention Instructor (QPR) under the National Board for Certified Counselors.

 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Getting the High without the Drugs or Alcohol

Getting the High without the Drugs or Alcohol

By Dr. Kerri Heath

A person gets addicted to feeling good, so they use anything they can to find that state.  If you or a loved one is addicted to something, it is essential to realize that you are really addicted to the feeling that substances bring.  Addiction is a condition that allows someone to ignore negative consequences which are caused by substance abuse in search of the rewarding effects that these drugs have.  It may involve the use of substances such as alcohol, inhalants, nicotine, cocaine, opioids, gambling, sex, and technology.  Scientific research provides evidence that all addictive behaviors share a neurobiological feature involving the neurotransmitter dopamine.  This chemical plays a major role in feelings of pleasure and signals motivation and desire.

People that are seeking these pleasurable feelings can find alternative ways to feel the same “high” that they get from dopamine, in ways that do not coincide with the negative consequences of the addictive vices.  There are dopamine-triggering foods that can be beneficial to your health.  The next time you get a craving for alcohol or feel compelled to grab a digital device, try eating one of these delicious treats instead:

  1. Our bodies create dopamine through protein that contains amino acids, such as beef, chicken, turkey, pork, and fish.
  2. Natural produce such as bananas, apples, and berries can release dopamine. Avocados, nuts, beans, seeds, beets, and artichokes are all examples of produce that work.
  3. Cottage cheese, ricotta cheese, yogurt, and milk are made from dairy products that convert to amino acids. Other cheeses and dark chocolate are also good in moderation.

Passages Recovery Center is fully aware that you can increase your dopamine through these healthier food options, which are being served at every meal.  In fact, people who come to Passages start feeling good about a week or two into treatment and it only increases from there.  People find other alternatives to feeling “high” in life that do not require substances.

 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Am I An Addict? | Passages Addiction Treatment Centers

Am I An Addict?

By Dr. Kerri Heath

“You will see it when you believe it.” –Wayne Dyer

This is a very tough question to answer.  An addict is someone whose life is controlled by alcohol or drugs.  Anyone who has struggled with substance abuse has told themselves many times that they “have it under control.” But what is the breaking point? When does a person who uses substances cross over to becoming an addict? What is the point of no return?  Only you can answer this question for yourself.  Don’t let anyone else define you or tell you that you are an addict.

Addiction is a behavior and should not become a label.  If it is a behavior then it can be changed but if it is a description or label, it is harder to overcome.  Your mental model is extremely important when trying to decide if you are an addict or not.  Dr. Wayne Dyer stated that “you’ll see it when you believe it” which describes the importance of making a distinction between being an addict and having addictive behaviors.  If you believe that you are an addict that is what will become your reality.

I have visited Alcohol Anonymous classes on a variety of occasions in order to answer this question for myself.  This group of loving and inclusive people create a safe space to open up about personal struggles. They find ways to help each other maintain abstinence from the substances or behaviors that lead to addiction. The meetings are consistently warm and welcoming, no matter what part of the world you are in. These 12-step programs give people a roadmap for which they can surrender their addictions, process difficult experiences and begin to form new habits and patterns.

The first thing I encountered at AA meetings is a group of accepting individuals that introduce themselves by stating that they are alcoholics. They make it seem so easy to say, however, I never felt comfortable introducing myself by saying, “Hi, I am an alcoholic.”  It never sat right with me. I did feel the pressure from others to label myself an addict because of the negative consequences that substances have initiated in my life.  I thought that people were judging me as being in denial or not ready to take the first step which is to “admit we are powerless over alcohol and that our lives have become unmanageable.”  However, that statement seems helpless.  I have used substances in unhealthy ways to numb pain and deal with difficult situations, but I never felt like labeling myself a victim over a substance would be productive, so I refuse to label myself an addict.

Passages Addiction Treatment Centers believes that you can create a future where substances do not have a grip on your life.  They give you a chance at life without having to label yourself or play a victim role.  There is freedom in this.  If you also feel uncomfortable with the first step of surrendering your power over to alcohol, then this may be the rehabilitation center for you.  A team of professionals will walk alongside you to create a new reality, one where you are in full control of your future.

 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Words Matter: Conversations About Addiction

Words Matter: Conversations About Addiction

By Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC

 “A man’s character may be learned from the adjectives which he habitually uses in conversation.” –Mark Twain

We’ve all heard the saying, “sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” But the field of psychology shows us words do matter. An effective way to change the stigma around addiction and mental health is how we talk about it. Proper usage of language and phrasing makes a big difference when it comes to treating those with addiction.

Being an ally to individuals struggling with mental health issues does not mean one has to volunteer, join an organization, or attend rallies to make a difference. The truth is, no matter the extent of an individual’s involvement, one can serve as a mental health advocate simply by changing the way they speak about addiction and alcoholism.

There are effective and ineffective ways to lessen the stigma around addiction. A simple change in how the disorder or diagnosis is phrased when discussing the person affected can have a huge impact on the way the community reacts, as well as whether the individual himself/herself seeks treatment. When discussing mental health issues with coworkers, friends, and family, phrasing and proper use of terminology makes an impression. An example of ineffective language includes labeling someone as “an alcoholic” or “bipolar.” No one says, “that person is cancer,” or “that person is diabetes.” When using language that pair diagnoses directly with a person’s identity, a message is being sent that addiction is representative of whom the person is. More effective phrasing would be, “that person has alcoholism” or “that person has bipolar disorder.” This way, there is an acknowledgment of presence without permanently labeling the person as such.

Having an addiction or alcoholism is not who the person is. It is a symptom of how the person struggles. 12 step programs encourage individuals to label themselves, thus identifying the disease as who they are: “My name is _______ and I am an alcoholic.” This approach is detrimental both to the individual himself/herself, as well as how the outside world sees and reacts to them. Experiencing difficulties with alcoholism or addiction at some point in one’s life does not mean that the person should be labeled as such for the remainder of their life. It is difficult, at times devastating, to be given a diagnosis (an example would be diagnosed with a disease such as cancer or being told you have AIDS). Pairing a disorder with who you are as an individual does not support the process of recovery. Saying “I am an alcoholic,” is like saying “I am AIDS.” A more effective way of handling a diagnosis is to explore the multitude of ways in which the disease/disorder can be treated. This encourages the individual to take initiative, actively participating in their treatment process that ultimately leads to experiencing self-efficacy.

The next time you find yourself labeling a person as “bipolar,” “an alcoholic,” or “a schizophrenic,” make this simple change instead: that person “has bipolar disorder,” “has an addiction/alcoholism,” or “has schizophrenia.” Words do matter, but the way we use them matters equally as much. Set a positive example by first noticing the language and phrasing. Then make the change in your own conversations for a lasting impression on others.

Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC is an educator, published researcher, and social media consultant for therapists. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Board Certified-TeleMental Health Provider (BC-TMH), and Suicide Prevention Instructor (QPR) under the National Board for Certified Counselors.

 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Resilience & Assertiveness at Passages Addiction Rehab

Resilience & Assertiveness

By Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC

“Life doesn’t get easier or more forgiving, we get stronger and more resilient.” 

–Steve Maraboli

Learning from past negative experiences including substance use and addiction can actually serve as your greatest asset when building a life free from drug and alcohol use. The cultivation of survival skills such as resilience and assertiveness prove useful when facing future adversity.

RESILIENCE

Resilience is the silver lining stemming from fearlessly facing and overcoming life’s challenges. Defined as the ability to become strong, healthy, or successful again after something bad happens, resilience literally means “to return to its original shape after an object has been pulled, stretched, pressed, bent, etc.” Once an individual sees that they have survived their addiction or use of substances as a means of self-medicating, they will be able to draw upon that knowledge, thus applying it to current life circumstances.

ASSERTIVENESS

Defined as the quality of being self-assured and confident without being aggressive, assertiveness is a learned skill and mode of communication. Assertiveness is not easily attained, especially when the default emotion may stem from pain and aggression. Feeling misunderstand, fearful, and isolated all serve as hurdles to overcome when building assertiveness. The goal is to speak your needs, set appropriate boundaries, and care for yourself acting as your own loving parent. We do this as human beings by putting our needs in their proper perspective and voicing in an appropriate manner when these needs are not being taken into serious consideration.

It is not enough to stop (fill in behavior). Discontinuing behaviors that are destructive to one’s self and others leave an individual with a void that must be filled. If that void is not replaced with a healthy behavior, it will either return to the unhealthy one or worse, be occupied by one even more harmful. The entire process requires a level of dedication to getting better by making changes that will result in desired results. This takes time, patience, and the willingness to ask for guidance and assistance. You never have to do anything alone when you seek help from others.

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC is an educator, published researcher, and social media consultant. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC) (e-therapy) and Suicide Prevention Instructor (QPR) under the National Board for Certified Counselors.

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Healing Through Writing at Passages Addiction Treatment Centers

By Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC

 

“All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.”              -Ernest Hemingway

Writing can be a healing process for those struggling with substance use and addiction. By reflecting on and reframing life events, the act of writing can assist in a more positive outlook and overall enlightenment.

5 Ways to Use Written Expression:

  1. Journaling—Set aside a time each day to quietly reflect in your journal. You will want to include any significant or memorial aspects of your day. Write freely and without hesitation. Be sure to include at least 1 positive interaction, good deed, change in perspective, or otherwise successful task completed each day. Keeping a balanced perspective is a large part of addiction treatment. Date your entries. Some individuals find healing comfort in reviewing previous entries.

 

  1. Keep a Running Log or Bullet Journal—Have a journal with you at all times and you can easily jot down your thoughts and feelings anywhere. Sometimes getting those nagging, repetitive thoughts out of your head and onto paper does the trick. In addition, when a brilliant idea or noteworthy occurrence takes place, jot that down as well. Date your entries so you can easily keep track of patterns, growth, and changes.

 

  1. Gratitude Lists—be creative here. Do not limit yourself to the obvious. By looking deeply within ourselves, we learn to see and appreciate the little gifts in our everyday lives. This will assist in keeping a healthy perspective and outlook on the day and overall future. If gratitude lists are new for you, begin with at least 3 things you are grateful for each day. You may choose to do this in the morning, or at night reflecting on the day’s events.

 

  1. Write a short story—This is a fun way to imagine different scenarios. We control the setting, characters, and outcome. You may choose to write about a past event that occurred in your life or rewrite/create the details and outcome of an event entirely. There is no standard for how long your story should be. Beginning with 1 page is a good place to start.

 

  1. Write a poem—Poetry is also an excellent way to focus our thoughts and feelings on specific topics. Begin by choosing one topic or subject and explore everything that comes to mind when writing about this topic. Poems range from haiku (3 phrases 17 syllables) to many pages. There is no standard for length. Begin with shorter poems and work your way up.

 

At Passages Malibu, our philosophy offers a genuine solution to end your addiction permanently. You deserve something different. Something better. Something that works.

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

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Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC is an educator, published researcher, and social media consultant. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC) (e-therapy) and Suicide Prevention Instructor (QPR) under the National Board for Certified Counselors.

Start with the Why: Treating Drug and Alcohol Addiction

by Dr. Kerri Heath and Chris Prentiss

“People don’t buy what you do, they buy WHY you do it.  And what you do simply proves what you believe.” –Simon Sinek 

In his book Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action, Simon Sinek presents the idea that great leaders can inspire others by putting the Why (the purpose) before the How (the process), or the What (the product).  His work led to the second most viewed TED talk of all time, because people resonate with the idea of having a greater purpose in life than just doing business. Similar to Sinek’s work in the corporate world, when you visit Passages Addiction Treatment Center, your recovery process will start and end with the “Why”…  

Many of our decisions in life are made from a subconscious place in our brain or from taking directions from others.  We rarely stop and ask ourselves WHY we are doing something. And even more rarely do we intentionally create a new ‘why’ behind our choices.  Science tells us through brain scans that before our brains make a conscious decision, the outcome can be predicted from the unconscious activity in the brain:

“Many processes in the brain occur automatically and without the involvement of our consciousness. This prevents our mind from being overloaded by simple routine tasks. But when it comes to decisions we tend to assume they are made by our conscious mind. This is questioned by our current findings.” (Nature Neuroscience)

This signifies that there is a lot going on in our subconscious minds that impact our lives in ways that we are not even aware of. At Passages, we want to help you identify why you are using so that you can end your addiction, forever.  Once you fully understand “why” you are using drugs and alcohol, the sources of addiction are brought to a conscious level, and the healing process begins.

Once the festering wounds (physical, emotional, mental and spiritual) are healed, they can no longer spill toxins into all areas of your life. You will be free to start over and create a life designed around a new sense of purpose.  At Passages Addiction Treatment Center, you will identify a new “Why” that drives every decision you make to rebuild your life… on your own terms.

It can be difficult to find your “Why”… the reason you were put on this earth… when so much of your time and energy is going towards the source of your pain.  Passages provides a team of specialized doctors, therapists, and health practitioners that will help you work with your body, your mind, your emotions and your spirit to stimulate self-healing and regain your passion for life.

by Brooke Cagle

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

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Prescription Drugs for Pain

Opiate Addiction Crisis in America: How Passages Treats Substance Abuse

At Passages Addiction Treatment Centers, we offer several programs for treating opiate addiction. Opiates are extremely powerful and have a very high potential for chemical dependency. Using opiates for an extended period of time ultimately causes the nerve cells in the brain to stop functioning correctly and inhibits the production of natural endorphins. Detox from opiates should be carefully monitored by medical professionals, as it can result in severe side effects and even death for unhealthy individuals. If you or a loved one is struggling with opiate dependency, please do not hesitate to contact us right away. As a part of the exclusive Passages Malibu client group, you will never be labeled or treated as the generic “addict.” Rather, we will seek to treat your opiate addiction on an individual basis, taking into consideration your personal history, career pressures, relationship issues, and body chemistry.

We have caring, dedicated professionals waiting to take your call and walk you through our substance abuse treatment programs and explain how we help our clients quit using opiates. Your opportunity to stop using drugs and finally end the vicious cycle of opiate abuse is waiting-call us now at (888) 397-0112.

Contact Passages today at (888) 397-0112 if you or a loved one needs treatment for an opioid addiction.

 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Photo via Unsplash

What Are Opioids and Why Are They Dangerous

By Jennifer McDougall

Opioids are prescribed to those with suffer from severe acute or chronic pain. Unfortunately, this drug is extremely addictive and dangerous even when taken as prescribed by a doctor. Many people who take opioids become physically dependent on the drug, making it difficult to detach or ween off once the pain has subsided and the drug is no longer needed. In America, more than 95 million people have a prescription for opioids and today’s records show that nearly 100 people a day die from an overdose of this pain relieving and all too accessible substance. Chances are you know someone who has either lost their life to an opiate addiction or who is currently heavily medicated on an opioid prescription. This highly addictive drug typically comes in pill form and can be fatal when mixed with alcohol or heavy doses other prescription drugs. The number of those in their late teenage years to early twenties experimenting with opioids have been on the rise the last 5-10 years. There is no sign of the death toll from overdoses slowing down. Learn more so you can help educate those around you and hopefully get the help you need before it takes another precious life from this world.

Why do people take opioids?

  • Back pain from an accident
  • Post surgery pain relief
  • Chronic pain due to cancer or other illness
  • Others take opioids to get high and numb emotional pain and trauma
  • Some take opioids due to peer pressure

Types of Opioids

  • Oxycodone (OxyCotin, Percodan, Percocet)
  • Hydrocodone (Vicodin, Lortab, Lorcet)
  • Diphenoxylate (Lomotil)
  • Morphine (Kadian, Avinza, MS Contin)
  • Codeine
  • Fentanyl (Duragesic)
  • Propoxyphene (Darvon)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid)
  • Meperidine (Demerol)
  • Methadone

Street Names For Opioids

  • Hillbilly heroin
  • OC
  • Oxy
  • Percs
  • Happy pills
  • Vikes

How do opioids affect the human brain?

When opioids are consumed orally the substance compound attaches to proteins found in the brain, gastrointestinal tract, spinal cord and other organs in the body, called opioid receptors.  They affect areas of the brain that promote feelings of relaxation and euphoria. Opioids change the perception of pain in the brain, allowing the human body to feel relieved of chronic discomfort and in many cases, reach a floating high where a person is numbed down. This feeling is not only what keeps people coming back for more of the drug, but also the compulsion to keep using to avoid withdrawal symptoms.

Depending on the amount taken, opioids can cause major drowsiness, constipation, difficulty in breathing properly, or sadly in many cases, death.

What happens when a person stops taking opioids?

  • Restlessness
  • Anxiety
  • Bone and muscle pain
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Cold sweats
  • Involuntary leg twitching or shaking
  • Abdominal cramping

Where can someone get treatment for opioid dependency and detox?

A supervised medical detox is advised when coming off opioids (or opiates). At Passages Addiction Treatment Centers, we professionalize in quality care for opioid and other prescription drug and alcohol detox and holistic treatment to completely break free from this brutal and life-threatening issue. There are many people who are in deep need of treatment but refuse to reach out for help. Don’t be one of those people. Passages offers several program options for you to be sure you are treated throughly in a safe and comfortable setting. It is not recommended that you try and detox from opioids from home. Instead, enroll in one of our 30-90 rehabilitation programs.

Also, read: “Treating Opiate Addiction at Passages Drug Rehab Center

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

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Addiction Rehab at Passages

Holistic Treatment at Passages Malibu Addiction Rehab

Are you ready to make the change of a lifetime and experience a transformation unlike anything else? At Passages, we are here to help make that happen. It is through our holistic drug and alcohol rehabilitation expertise that you are sure to be in the hands of top quality physicians, clinical therapists, and a 24/7 staff here to see that your time with us is a success. Take a few moments to read the infographic below to learn precisely how you can get started in transforming your life, your mind, body, and spirit in great ways you probably never imagined possible.

Addiction Ends Here™

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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