Browsing Category

Addiction

Addiction, Addiction Treatment Centers, Alcohol Addiction, Alcohol Rehab, Dependency, Heroin Addiction, Passages Rehabs, Prescription Drug Addiction, Recovery, Rehab, Relationships

How to Talk to Your Loved One About Addiction

By Jennifer McDougall

Sitting back and watching a loved one spiral out of control is heart-wrenching. The person you once knew has become angry, unstable, and quite possibly irresponsible. We know that you want to help them as best as you can. Without forcing them into rehab, it’s better if they see the choice as their own, but that you helped open their eyes to acknowledge a life-threatening problem. Don’t wait for them to lose everything before you step in and lend a helping hand. There are many things to expect, as this is not always a comfortable or easy process. Here are a few things to keep in mind before you initiate the conversation to motivate them into the right direction.

  • The person you love and care deeply about is most likely in denial. They may not believe there is a problem to begin with. It will take time for them to accept the fact that they are on a dangerous path that could be fatal and completely detrimental to everyone involved. They may think they’re behavior is normal and since they are alive and functioning there is nothing to discuss. This is where they are wrong and you shouldn’t give up persistence on the matter.
  • Expect volatile and emotional behaviors as this confrontation will be upsetting for them. Try your best not to fuel the fire with more anger. Make your points clear to them in a way that will stop them from yelling after they’ve screamed at you, told you how wrong you are, and how little you know about anything they are experiencing.

Many of those who are addicted to drugs and alcohol spiral out of control whether it is immediately after being hooked on a substance or gradually over time. They desperately want to grab a hold of something that gives them purpose and fills void. Typically, they feel as though their lives are meaningless and no one really cares what they are experiencing.

Reaching for the bottle or a syringe to get high takes them away from the place they feel unwanted and forgotten. It’s painful for everyone involved: the addicted person, the family members, co-workers who witness the destruction, and friends who want to help. The addict may begin hearing that their condition is a disease and they are powerless over their own demons. That is not true. At Passages, we don’t believe that addiction is an incurable disease.  We believe in the empowering nature that as humans, we can overcome any obstacle that is put in our way; that if we look at what is causing the problem and focus on healing the underlying conditions then it is absolutely possible to break free and live an addiction-free life.

We believe that those who become dependent on drugs and alcohol do so for the following reasons:

  1. A chemical imbalance
  2. Events of the past you have not reconciled
  3. Current conditions you can’t cope with
  4. Things you believe that aren’t true

Chances are your loved one is struggling with one or more of these factors. In order for them to overcome their addiction they will need to enter a treatment center, such as Passages Addiction Treatment Centers where the healing process is focused on treating the underlying conditions. Talking to your loved one may seem uncomfortable at first, but it’s important that you don’t hesitate as the problem could grow increasingly worse. Here are 7 key points to focus on.

  1. Put a stop to enabling You may not realize it, but you could be making the problem worse by creating excuses for them, or sugarcoating the condition. Be stern about ground rules and the expectations you have for them. Hold them to their promises and commitments. Let nothing slide.
  2. Educate yourself as well as friends and family on everything there is to know about addiction. Start by purchasing a copy of The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure, written by Pax and Chris Prentiss.
  3. Ask questions. Find out what it is that is driving them to use drugs and alcohol as coping mechanisms. Let them open up to you. Listen attentively and make eye contact assuring them that you care and hear what they are saying.
  4. Make them feel loved instead of judged. Avoid using the term “addict” when addressing them. Don’t yell or make harsh threats. Try to avoid using phrases that belittle their worth. Instead, empower them and remind them of their strengths, aspirations, accomplishments, and how much they matter to you.
  5. Consider hiring a professional interventionist to conduct an intervention at home or somewhere private.
  6. Provide them with information on treatment centers. Give them brochures, contact information, photos, and enlightening reading material. Talk to them about the many treatment options available for them to get help and put a stop to this brutal battle.
  7. Suggest alternative options for coping with pain, social anxiety, or trauma. Provide them with a list of things to do and give them a sense of hope that things can get better with change. Life doesn’t have to be unmanageable or painful. It can be fulfilling and full of life if you’re willing to make real lifestyle changes.

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 

Photo courtesy of: Jennifer McDougall

Addiction, Dependency, Relationships, Self-Improvement

10 Signs of Self-Destruction

By Jennifer McDougall

There’s a chance you know someone who has self-destructive behavior. You may have already recognized the signs and maybe you’ve talked to them about your concerns. The truth is that they might not realize what they are doing. Typically, those who have self-destruct tendencies do so for attention, self-pity, or maybe it’s because they have a load of issues they are unwilling to deal with. It’s an obvious cry for help. Instead, they choose to act out and behave in a careless manner that benefits no one, not even themselves, regardless of the people they drag down with them.

Here are 10 signs someone you know is self-destructive:

  1. Disregard for personal safety and security
  2. Careless spending
  3. Negative conversation
  4. Poor choices in friendships
  5. Blame others for their circumstances
  6. Overindulgence; purchases, eating habits, etc.
  7. Suicidal or bodily cutting
  8. Overuse of drugs and/or alcohol
  9. Refuse professional help or advice
  10. Ignore personal routine tasks; hygiene, personal finances, etc.

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Image via Pixabay

Addiction, Dependency, Recovery, Self-Improvement

What is Self-Destruction?

Self-destruction comes in many forms. It can be mental, emotional or physical.

In human context, selfdestructive behavior is a widely used phrase that conceptualizes certain kinds of destructive acts as belonging to the self. It also has the property that it characterizes certain kinds of self-inflicted acts as destructive 

It is possible that you or someone you know is self-destructive. It can become a bad habit that can only be corrected when the person realizes what they are doing and wants to stop. Sometimes it takes a person to hit rock bottom to then ask, “How did this happen to me?”

What Does it Mean to be Self-Destructive?

Many of those who are self-destructive have low self-esteem or self-respect.  This can be brought on by a personal life event such as a change in job status, death of a loved one, or past trauma.  Self-destructive behavior can also be a result of previous neglect, abuse, bullying (classmates, co-workers, ex-lovers, etc.), or a lack of accomplishment. A person may react with carelessness, anger, uncontrollable emotions, and irrational actions.  Feelings of sadness, loneliness, and depression can be overwhelming, and cause the person to lose hope in life. In many cases, they will pretend to be happy and act like everything is fine; not admitting that they are struggling to cope.

You can help a loved one who suffers from self-destruction by being supportive, loving, kind, reassuring of their capabilities, and letting them know that they are special.  There are cases that require professional help.  To learn more, read “10 Signs of Self-Destruction” on our blog.

 

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Image via Pixabay

Addiction

Signs and Symptoms of Substance Abuse

By: Jennifer McDougall

The signs and symptoms of drug or alcohol abuse can usually be recognized quickly. Sometimes though, it takes more time to notice the collective traits. If you are suspicious of a loved one abusing drugs or alcohol here are several clues:

  • Bloodshot (glazy red) eyes
  • Enlarged or smaller sized pupils than usual
  • Deterioration in physical appearance (uneven skin tone, decreased grooming, severe weight gain, or weight loss)
  • Sudden change in sleep pattern or pretends to be sick
  • Hyped up behavior and saying things that make no sense
  • Bad hygiene (bad breathe, clothes smell, teeth begin to yellow, eyes appear droopy)
  • Suddenly prefers to spend a majority of their time alone
  • Neglects responsibilities
  • Disappears and gives no explanation
  • On-going money troubles (constantly complains of a lack of funds)
  • Slow motor skills, delayed reactions, and slurred speech
  • Sudden need for money and experiences unexplained financial issues
  • Behaviors seem to be shady, secretive, or suspicious
  • Change is circle of friends, hobbies, interests, and preferred places to hang out
  • Lack of motivation or drive to work or study
  • Unusual anxiety and fear
  • Increased anger, mood swings and a change in attitude
  • Personality changes
  • Fighting, stealing, or illegal activity

If you notice any of these personality or character trait changes in your friend or loved one talk to them first.   If they are resistant, there is likely an issue that needs to be addressed.  Be patient, but don’t hesitate to seek help.

 

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Image via We Heart It

Addiction, Alcohol Rehab, Dependency

Learning to be With Your Pain Instead of Escaping It

By Jennifer McDougall

Pain is the most common reason behind addiction. It comes in many forms; physical, mental, and emotional pain. It stems from the brain and flows into your central nervous system. An extreme amount of pain and discomfort can potentially send you right over the edge, but if you listen closely, it can also be the most helpful thing that can happen for you. The majority of people who seek medical attention or temporarily relief through the use of drugs and alcohol do so, because they are experiencing some sort of pain. It is in fact, a survival mechanism to help protect your body. Those who are born without the ability to feel things due to issues within the central nervous system typically do not live long healthy lives. We must understand the importance of being able to feel everything our bodies are trying to communicate to us. When people use drugs and alcohol to numb their pain, their perceptions towards situations are altered, along with their consciousness and they increase the risk of making really lousy decisions.

Whether it’s from abuse (of any kind), trauma, fear, anxiety, or physical ailments; we have all felt pain one way or another. Throughout this journey in life, we must all learn to adjust to the changes that come and go. One thing that is guaranteed is change itself. Change is inevitable. What is causing your pain and sorrow one day could be gone the next.  By trying to escape pain there is an immense potential of making matters extremely worse for ourselves and those we love. It’s important to be fully conscious and aware of our surroundings so that we can make good decisions and know when something is not right. Because of perhaps the horrible things that have happened in your life your body reminds you when something feels off or dangerous. When our heart breaks for the first time we learn to be more cautious in future relationships. When we cut our finger slicing veggies, or burn our hand on a hot pan, we learn to be more careful in the kitchen. When we have our first car accident we learn to be more aware of others on the road and pay close attention to what’s going on around us at all times. Pain teaches us lessons in life and that’s something we shouldn’t ignore.

There are times in your life when you may be stressed, overwhelmed, broken, hurt beyond belief, and sad over a loss. Pain is a natural feeling that is meant to be felt. To be with your pain means to accept what is happening in your life and throughout your body. We have a natural right to feel everything that this sometimes cruel and unfair world throws at us. The best part about all of it is that you have a choice. You can either choose to accept what is, let go of what is not (anymore), and cope with an attitude of optimism that circumstances will improve.

Your mind and body must heal from the pain you have experienced over time. This can be done by using therapy methods such as the ones used at Passages Addiction Treatment Centers. For anyone who is or has suffered with emotional, mental, or physical pain, knows the discomfort that can be debilitating. When you experience pain there is an instant shock-wave like feeling that erupts and at times, it feels so uncontrollable. When this happens, you must first practice deep breathing and try to remain calm.

Reaching for the bottle or a substance to get high isn’t the solution. When you find yourself in a situation where you are sinking deep with a weight of pain; call a friend, go for a quiet walk, have a cup of tea, write in a private journal, or turn up your favorite song and sing it out loud. Life is better when you can learn to manage your pain instead of escaping it. Other means of pain relieve can also be helpful such as acupuncture, massage, meditation, and stretching exercises. A healthy diet, drinking plenty of water, and 7-8 hours of nightly rest will also help.

 

 

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 

Photo by: Jennifer McDougall

Ecstasy Addiction

The Dangers of Ecstasy

By Jennifer McDougall

Many times when ecstasy users grab ahold of this drug, they don’t realize the amount of danger they are putting themselves in. Ecstasy is one of the scariest drugs because a person can overdose on it before they have time to rewind and retrace their steps or get any help.

Ecstasy eliminates the process in which one can recall events, remember specific things that happened while on the drug. It destroys Nigral cells in the brain, which cannot be recreated or brought back to life.  We are born with about 400,000 of these cells and once you lose under 250,000 of them you could be at risk for getting Parkinson’s disease.

Like many drugs, the chemicals and continued use, destroy parts of your body and vital organs that you need in order to live a long and healthy life.

Someone who abuses ecstasy increases their risk to develop a number of health problems down the road. As for more immediate affects, ecstasy has been known to cause panic attacks, blurred vision, high blood pressure, heart attacks, and too often, lead to death.

One of the more common places ecstasy is used, is at night clubs or live music venues. The reason for this is the rush that is created when someone combines substance, loud music, crowds of people, lots of movement, and low lights. Yes, it is a very dangerous combination and when a person participates in this type of activity, they can easily get caught up in the rush, the fun, the moment when they feel happy and alive; In that moment is when everything can turn and your life, body, and whole world can come crashing down on you in the blink of an eye.

When we use substances to try and increase the amount of “fun” we could have, we increase the chance of losing it all. Don’t be one of the many thousands of people each year who overdose on Ecstasy.

Symptoms of Overdose:

  • Headache
  • Blurred vision
  • Dry mouth
  • Panic attacks
  • Insomnia
  • Paranoia
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Increased body temperature
  • Abdominal pain and pressure
  • Stiff muscles
  • Chest pain

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Image via We Heart It

Addiction, Passages Malibu, Passages Rehabs, Passages Santa Monica, Passages Ventura, Recovery, Relationships, Spirituality

Reading Recommendations by Passages Addiction Treatment Centers

By Jennifer McDougall

Studies have found reading to be one of the most beneficial activities you can do that can help improve your life and physical well-being. Reading can help improve your memory, focus and concentration, vocabulary, writing skills, and reduce a large amount of stress. It also allows you to expand your mind with a vast amount of knowledge with an endless number of exploratory topics.

At Passages Addiction Treatment Centers, we encourage our clients to read and be open to new material. To help you find some of the latest and greatest books on the market we have created the following recommended reading list. We hope you enjoy these many books, some of which written by our Co-Founders, Pax and Chris Prentiss.

  1. Be What You Want Have What You Want by Chris Prentiss
  2. The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom by Don Miguel Ruiz
  3. The Laws of Love: Creating the Relationship of Yours Dreams by Chris Prentiss
  4. The Untethered Soul: The Journey Beyond Yourself by Michael A. Singer
  5. Zen and the Art of Happiness by Chris Prentiss
  6. Positive Energy: 10 Extraordinary Prescriptions for Transforming Fatigue, Stress, and Fear into Vibrance, Strength, and Love by Judith Orloff
  7. The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure by Pax and Chris Prentiss
  8. The 5 Love Languages by Gary Chapman
  9. I Ching Wisdom: More Guidance from the Book of Answers, Volume Two by Wu Wei
  10. The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg

To shop our extensive collection of books, clothing, and other merchandise please visit our online wellness store at www.PassagesWellnessStore.com.

large

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Photos by: Jennifer McDougall

Addiction, Self-Improvement

10 Ways to Overcome Symptoms of Depression

By Jennifer McDougall

Depression affects millions of people across the world; of all ages. In many cases, those who suffer from depression also suffer from anxiety disorders, as well as, drug and alcohol addictions. It is not uncommon for those suffering from depression symptoms to turn to drugs and alcohol as a way to temporarily numb the pain and regain a pinch of satisfaction. The problem with this type of outlet is that it tends to lead to an array of health problems, emotional stress, loss of clarity and mental focus, as well as financial and relationship trouble.

When someone is feeling depressed they may not reach out immediately for help or want to talk about what is causing them to feel alone and hopeless. There are many situations and circumstances that can cause a person to feel this way. It could be due to loosing a job, breakup, financial struggle, loss of a loved one, poor diet, lack of exercise and outdoor activity, or major change at home or work. They may not feel like they add up to the expectations drawn out for them. Without supportive friends and family members, many of the difficulties we face in life tend to be much more challenging.

Many of us go through certain phases in life; we experience changes in our relationships, finances, and careers. Through those changes it is important to remain focused on our goals so that we don’t get overwhelmed with the “what if’s”, “why not’s”, “how come’s” and “what now.”

It is not uncommon for someone to experience symptoms of depression a few times throughout their lives. What matters most is what to look out for and know how to treat these symptoms before things take a downward spiral towards physical harm, addiction, or suicide.

Here are a several signs that you or someone you care about is suffering with depression.

  • An overwhelming sense of sadness
  • Loss of concentration and interest
  • On-going negative thoughts and comments
  • Excessive drinking or use of drugs
  • Aggression or reckless behavior
  • Too little or too much sleep
  • Little to no motivation or enthusiasm
  • Extreme changes in appetite
  • Suicidal thoughts or remarks

Depression is not something to ever feel ashamed of. It affects millions of people who have managed to overcome the symptoms and go on to live a happy and healthy life. Here are 10 ways to overcome the dark dreary symptoms of depression.

  1. Connect with friends and family who help motivate and support you in a positive way.
  2. Get 8 hours of sleep.
  3. Drink plenty of water.
  4. Meditate
  5. Eat healthy.
  6. Avoid drugs and alcohol.
  7. Add lighting and spruce up your living space.
  8. Journal your thoughts, ideas, and day-to-day experiences.
  9. Watch feel-good or funny movies.
  10. Change up your worn out routine.

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 

Image via We Heart It

Addiction, Relationships

Codependent Relationships and Addiction

By Jennifer McDougall

The Merriam- Webster Dictionary defines codependency as, “a psychological condition or a relationship in which a person is controlled or manipulated by another who is affected with a pathological condition (as an addiction to alcohol or heroin); broadly :  dependence on the needs of or control by another.”

The dependency on anything is the feeling that you can’t live without a person or substance. That in order to survive you must have this one thing or this one person in your life. You need it to be happy. The truth is that you have subconsciously connected deeply to this particular person or substance without realizing it until the grip has already been fastened. That is the scary part, because most of us don’t realize we are dependent until we realize we have to figure out a way to break free from the weight it tugs on us. One minute we have a crush on someone, the next we can’t seem to bear the thought of doing anything without them.

What causes this to happen?

In many cases, those who find themselves in codependent relationships have many insecurities, low standards, unhealthy habits and behavior traits, and unstable moods.

10 Signs you are in a codependent relationship:

  1. You are more focused on the needs of your partner rather than caring for your own personal needs.
  2. You and your partner disrespect each other causing you both to feel devalued and unappreciated regardless of the work you put into the relationship.
  3. You can’t make any plans without feeling the need to involve your partner even when it’s an “all women’s” or “all men’s” outing.
  4. You feel ashamed to talk to your friends and family about the details of your relationship, because you’re afraid of what they will think of you.
  5. You are unable to have fun and enjoy time away from your partner.
  6. You support your partner at the cost of your own wellbeing (financially, emotionally, physically, mentally, and socially).
  7. Anxiety is one of the more common emotions you have in this relationship. You no longer feel much joy or happiness because you are so busy second guessing everything that goes on from one day to the next.
  8. You feel burnt out, tired, unfocused, unhappy, lonely, and/or confused about the direction on this relationship, because it seems to be headed in no other direction than south, and it’s taking a toll on you.
  9. You or your partner begins drinking more or using drugs to cope with their discomfort this relationship is bringing.
  10. You walk on eggshells and live in defensive mode every time your partner is around or you have a conversation.

How to change the course of your codependent relationship and break the addiction

In life, it’s important to be able to stand on your own two feet, to have fun, enjoy life; be your own person without relying on others to bring you happiness. We must practice doing things alone and being comfortable in our skin in order to have a healthy and well-balanced relationship with anyone.

When we latch on to other people or substances to keep up “happy”, we lose sight on our purpose in life; we get sidetracked and our mind becomes a fog. This is an unhealthy way to live, so what can you do to break-free from codependency and balance out your life so you can feel lighter, more energized, and more fulfilled?  Well, here are a few ideas:

  1. Spend more time with friends and family. Keep your connections with those who you can relax and have a good time with without getting yourself into any type of trouble or complicating matters with your partner.
  2. Talk to your partner about your relationship goals and where the two of you would like to see things go within the next couple years.
  3. Spend more time alone doing things that help you become a better person. Get rest, read a new book, sign up for a local gym, pick up a new hobby such as photography or tennis.

 

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Image via We Heart It

Addiction, Inpatient Alcohol Rehab, Inpatient Drug Rehab, Passages Malibu, Passages Rehabs, Rehab, Residential Treatment Facilities

5 Commonly Asked Questions about Passages Addiction Treatment Centers

By Jennifer McDougall

1. “How much does it cost?”

Our pricing can vary depending on which facility you choose. We do accept a handful of private insurance policies. For specific pricing information please call (888) 397-0112, and ask to speak to an admissions adviser today.

2. “What do you guys do there?”

At Passages, we use various holistic and intensive therapy methods to help discover the underlying reasons to why an individual is using drugs and alcohol.

We believe in the following four causes of dependency:

  1. Chemical imbalance
  2. Unresolved events from the past
  3. Beliefs you hold that are inconsistent with what is true
  4. Inability to cope with current conditions

“If you have ancestors who were dependent on drugs or alcohol, and you have learned about the genetic factor, and you believe you have a genetic predisposition to become dependent, that will work heavily against you. Genetics play a part, but only a small one, and your tendency to become dependent, if you have one, is easily overcome by curing the four causes.” – Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure

All the four causes of addiction are explained in great detail in The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure book.

“Unless you identify your core condition and correct it, you’ll probably continue to be dependent on substances for relief.” – Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure

3. “What makes you so different?”

One of the major differences between Passages and any other treatment center is that not only are we not 12-step based, but we intend on healing the root cause of a person’s addiction through groundbreaking treatment methods.

Passages Malibu has been healing the underlying causes of addiction for over 15 years. We have a sister location in Ventura, California, a Luxury Sober Living facility in Santa Monica, California, and an Outpatient Treatment Center in Venice, California.  Our treatment team has years of excellent experience to be sure your stay here is comfortable and successful.

Passages is lead by father and son, Chris and Pax Prentiss. The two have both survived gruesome and treacherous darkness caused by addiction and they know firsthand what it takes to break-free from the nasty battle of addiction.

Pax, who is both the CEO and Co- Founder of Passages Addiction Treatment Centers, was an addict for 10 years. He was hooked on cocaine, heroin, and alcohol and it almost killed him several times.  Because of the help from his loving father, Chris, Pax was able to pull through and now lives an addiction-free life.

4. “How can you help me?”

If you make the choice to discover sobriety at one of Passages Addiction Treatment Centers, you will be in the hands of quality care and trained professionals who want to see you discover your true potential. Our staff is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. We are here to be sure you are comfortable and feel secure while going through treatment.

5. “Can you really cure addiction?”

Chris Prentiss puts it nicely, “What you believe about yourself, about alcoholism and addiction, and about the possibility of a cure are key factors in determining whether you’ll overcome your dependency on addictive substances and behaviors or remain dependent on them.” The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure

If you believe that you are going to be one way for the rest of your life than that is what you will be, because that is what you believe to be true. If you alter your perception on this idea and understand the true meaning of dependency, you may come to realize that addiction is not the root problem. The problem is what is driving the addiction.

1016040_10151501639417098_772101313_n

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Photo by: Jennifer McDougall

Alcohol Addiction, Alcohol Rehab, Passages Malibu, Rehab, Self-Improvement

10 Good Reasons Its Time to Quit Drinking Alcohol

By Jennifer McDougall

Besides not waking up with a painful headache and a list of regrets from the night before there are several other reasons to quit drinking alcohol. The amount of damage alcohol does to your body should be enough reason to avoid alcohol altogether, but for many it’s not.

What if I told you that your overall quality of life would dramatically improve with the absence of alcohol? Within weeks you could see increased productivity at work and more money in the bank. Do I have your attention? Okay, good.

If you are unsure whether or not you should quit drinking, here are a few clues to help you see that this is without a doubt the right move for you.

  • If you find yourself drinking alone more than three nights a week.
  • If you are lying to others about your drinking habits.
  • If you have a reckless attitude which leads you to driving under the influence.
  • If you wake up with one-too-many moral hangovers full of shame and regret.
  • If your relationships are falling apart because of your intoxicated behaviors.
  • If your job or career is suffering due to the lack of arriving on time, preforming tasks that are expected of you and failure to follow through on ideas and promises.
  • If your self-esteem is at rock bottom because you no longer see yourself as someone who is making good decisions and prospering in life.
  • If you start fights while your intoxicated and cause unnecessary drama that end up making you look ridiculous.
  • If someone mentions to you that it’s time to give up your drinking habits.
  • If you have increased anxiety and body aches.
  • If your face begins to appear more puffy than usual.
  • If your doctor suggests you dry up and get sober due to health concerns.
  • If you have to ask yourself if 10 am is too early to start drinking.

Now that you’ve established the fact that this habit is making your life more and more unbearable it’s time to look at the benefits of putting down the bottle. Keep in mind there are more than just 10 benefits, but these are the ones we think are the most important.

  1. To promote a healthier brain and liver.
  2. Increase your energy level.
  3. Save a lot more money for valuable things that actually matter and are worth investing in.
  4. You will boost your levels of creativity.
  5. Improve your overall complexion.
  6. Wake up earlier feeling refreshed and more energized.
  7. Gain mental clarity- say goodbye to a cloudy mind.
  8. You will feel empowered to make the most out of life and help other people.
  9. You will feel much happier and self-confident.
  10. Will have more time for productive and exciting hobbies.

 

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Image via We Heart It

Addiction, Recovery, Sober Lifestyle

Are you the Enabler? Here’s How to Change That

By Jennifer McDougall

When someone you know is battling an addiction and desperately needs help changing their current conditions and lifestyle the last thing they need is to be influenced by an enabler. If you are not careful, that enabler could be you.

Do you have a loved one who wants to quit drinking or using drugs, but on the weekends you try to persuade them to loosen up and have some fun by encouraging them to indulge?  If so, you are not helping this person get to where they want and need to be. You are enabling them.

Sometimes a person who is trying to come off drugs or alcohol has a difficult time communicating the problem. They may even have difficulty saying no to you. Maybe they have not realized yet why they are using drugs and alcohol; all they know is they want to stop, because it is creating a mess out of their life.

If someone you know has talked to you about making a positive change such as quitting smoking, drinking, or using drugs please listen to them carefully. In many cases, there is a lot more to it than the substance abuse itself. Persuading them to do something they actually don’t want to do could reside in anger quickly down the road. They may wake up with a hangover the next morning and yell at you asking you why you don’t take the situation seriously and respect their wishes to get sober. Surprisingly enough this happens a lot within families, circles of friends, even co-workers who do not understand the sincerity of one’s wishes.

Here are 10 ways to stop being an enabler to a friend or loved one battling an addition:

  1. Remove all temptation. Do not encourage or provoke drug or alcohol use at any time.
  2. Motivate and support the positive changes the person is making.
  3. Allow them to take responsibility for their daily life (finances, job, rent, etc.) while offering help when things become too overwhelming.
  4. Help provide the skills and resources needed for the abuser to become the best version of themselves that they can reasonably achieve.
  5. Do not try to sugarcoat the truth. Be real with them, but be ready to listen to their confessions and questions.
  6. Keep a close watch on what you say around your loved one. Don’t entice them of stories about partying and reminiscing of times when you would get wasted.
  7. Make sobriety fun (see: 23 Fun Sober Activities).
  8. Stop coming to the person’s rescue every single time they fail. Failure can actually be a good thing if you allow it to work in the way that teaches the abuser a valuable lesson. Coming to their every call with a solution of your own does not actually help this person.
  9. Do not punish the person for their actions. Be open to listening to them. Be there to hear them express themselves without you getting angry at them.
  10. Do not be ashamed of your loved one for their behaviors. Do not tell them how they have embarrassed you or made you look bad in some way. It is important to be stable and compassionate in any disheartening situation your love one may endure with you. Your shame towards your loved one will leave them feeling depressed and withdrawn.
  11. Reward them sporadically with gifts, notes, and a listening ear.

 

 

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Follow Passages Malibu on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Photo by: Jennifer McDougall