Browsing Tag

isolation

Is Isolation Healthy in Addiction Recovery

By Jennifer McDougall

It can be tempting for many people, especially those in recovery, to shut out the world for days at a time, but how much isolation is too much? Because of the high risk for increased loneliness during times of isolation, it is important to point out that if you are feeling a desire to pull back from social environments and becoming disengaged in what was motivating and inspiring you before, that you now need to look at WHY you are wanting to resort to solitude.

How to know when you’ve been isolating for too long

  1. You feel unmotivated

    Shake up the energy in your home first by decluttering every room and every corner. If you’ve been at home a lot lately, chances are things have begun to pile up. That stuff you have just sitting around is collecting dust and blocking out strong energy forces that help you stay enthusiastic about life. Seeing clutter has a negative effect on how we feel. Start by cleaning up. Then work on getting outside and calling a friend or nice family member who can provide you with some good laughter and support. This may help push you to create a better routine and implement new fun activities.

  2. You are experiencing increase in depression and anxiety

    It’s time to get more exercise and practice meditation. You are going to be okay but you need to switch things up. Sometimes we keep doing something long after it is no longer working for us anymore. This happens a lot to those who have used drugs and alcohol for long periods of time. They stop being fun and start being something dangerous and works against you in every way possible. When you’re being depressed and anxious, that’s your body telling you that something has to change.

  3. Your mind is restless at night and you can’t fall asleep

    Get your journal and start writing down all your ideas. This is a great way to calm your racing thoughts and give you a productive outlet for plugging your emotions into something that helps you see things a little more clearly.

  4. You want to get out and do something but you don’t know where to start

    Begin getting out and about a little bit every day. Go to the beach or a park to sit or lay outside under the sun and read a book.

The year is 2020, and many people have experienced an overwhelming sense of loneliness due to a major shift in how we are able to connect with one another from a distance. With the stay-at-home orders and quarantine scenario starting back in March, we have been glued to our phones, computers, and televisions like never before. It’s almost September now, and restaurants are open again, most small businesses are finding a way to continue to provide services to their customers while following strict guidelines enforced by each state.

Thankfully, Passages Malibu and Passages Ventura have been able to remain open during these unprecedented times. We have seen an increased number of phone calls and web inquires for treatment due to the massive hike in substance abuse related issues this year. Passages is grateful to all of the staff who have helped keep things running smoothly and providing a substantial amount of support to one another.

Why Would Someone Want to Isolate Themselves

The pandemic. It also could be that this person recently experienced a job loss, a breakup, the death of a loved one, financial hardship, a desire for peace and quiet because everything around them feels chaotic, is physically or emotionally drained, feels down about themselves, has been deeply hurt by people in the past and prefers to keep to themselves in order to protect themselves from future pain.

Sometimes, isolating is a necessary reset that we must allow our self to flourish. It is not dangerous when appropriately managed. We have to be mindful to incorporate small blocks of time throughout the day to socialize with other people or not. It is essential to talk to other people, release any thoughts, feelings, or ideas you have piling up inside your head. While it may be tempting just to sit inside, work, listen to music, and enjoy time alone, it’s also critical that you exercise once a day to help maintain a healthy rhythm and flow to your sober lifestyle. One of the best feelings is that sense of accomplishment at the end of the day when you can lay your head down at night and know that you completed a difficult task and followed through on vital assignments that needed to be done.

One of the key elements that people crave in isolation is the clarity to concentration and direct all their focus onto a challenging goal they feel strongly about. What gets people off course in isolation is the lack of balance and accountability because when you block people and society out of your life, you don’t allow the most important thing to happen: connection. We all need to feel connected to something, and someone who understands us hears us and gently pushes us to do better and be better every single day. By having a connection to others, we can thrive more abundantly and feel loved, which is something every person on earth wants more than anything else.

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Call Passages today at (888) 397-0112. Most insurance is accepted.

Personality Changes With Drug Dependency

As drug dependency begins to take a physical hold on a dependent individual, personality changes can occur. Illegal drugs begin to affect brain function—including the areas regulating cognition and mood—by altering chemical messengers in the brain known as neurotransmitters. While some illegal drugs create specific and predictable alterations in personality, others can initiate erratic behavior and moods uncharacteristic of the person behind the addiction.

Personality Changes With Drug Dependency

Because of the nature of chemical dependency, certain predictable chemical changes occur when various drugs interact with the brain. As dependency progresses, personality changes become more marked, tragically taking users away from their truest selves. Here are just a few of the stereotypical personality changes that occur when specific drugs are used.

  • Cocaine

    As a stimulant, cocaine tends to incite irritable, edgy behavior. Users become forgetful, secretive, and dishonest. Depression can alternate with aggression, leading to rapid mood swings. Users can act manic and arrogant when high and depressed and lethargic when withdrawal sets in.

  • Meth

    Over time, methamphetamine dependency can drastically change a person’s personality. Users become aggressive, impulsive and selfish. Anxiety and agitation alternates with avoidance and depression. Meth users develop anti-social personality traits, showing little empathy and callous behavior.

  • Anabolic Steroids

    Anabolic steroids, often used for athletic performance, can also create drastic changes in personality. “Roid rage” can also set in, marked by periods of high aggression and even physical violence.

  • PCP

    Angeldust, or PCP, can create detached behavior as its dissociative properties kick in. Users experience a loss of natural ego boundaries, leading to a sense of depersonalization where they seem to “space out” or feel otherworldly. PCP users often act dishonestly to the point of delusion, and experience high levels of anger towards others. PCP users can also begin to experience psychotic breaks, and schizophrenic behavior.

  • Crack

    The personality changes that crack cocaine causes tends to differ from other forms of cocaine. Crack can create euphoric, overconfident behavior where the ego becomes magnified. Crack users also experience high impulsivity, an overload of energy, and delusions and hallucinations, marked by illogical thought and disjointed cognition.

  • Ecstasy

    Ecstasy use often leads to intimate, animated, and highly social behavior during periods of use. Users become philosophical, with spiritual feelings and a desire for physical and emotional closeness. However, prolonged ecstasy use can create periods of depression, isolation, and dissociation.

  • Marijuana

    Marijuana dependent individuals become lethargic and self-satisfied during dependency. They become easily amused, with short-term memory problems that create situations marked by irresponsible behavior. Marijuana users will often seem less mentally sharp than usual and experience bouts of mild depression during long-term use.

 

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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