Browsing Tag

addiction rehab

How to Maximize Healing in Rehab

How to Maximize Healing in Rehab

By Jennifer McDougall

Picture this. You have made it to rehab, and now you can begin healing from drug and alcohol addiction. Our holistic approach focuses on treating the underlying conditions causing a person to use and abuse drugs and alcohol. Our 5-star fabulous facility offers a wide range of luxurious amenities. You can enjoy our heated pool and jacuzzi between sessions, play a game of tennis or basketball with other clients and trainers. You can meditate or read by the waterfall. During lunch, you can sit outside and soak up the sun as you look out to the Pacific Ocean. We also have a top of the line, fully equipt gym with fitness instructors ready to help you meet all your fitness goals and help heal your body from the physical damage inflicted by drug and alcohol abuse.

During your time in rehab at Passages, you will have the opportunity to experience a variety of treatment methods that help you heal from the inside out. To maximize your healing process we recommend you do the following things.

  1. Fully participate in your therapy sessions
  2. Be open and honest with your treatment team so they can best cater to your individual needs
  3. See your time in rehab as an opportunity to learn and grow
  4. Read The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure book, which can find in your bedroom or on various bookshelves and stands at Passages
  5. Practice visual meditation before you go to sleep to imagine your perfect self living a perfectly happy and peaceful life
  6. Journal every day to keep track of your progress
  7. Feed your mind positive and empowering thoughts
  8. Keep your body properly hydrated and partake in the nutritious meals served from our five-star kitchen
  9. Build connections with other clients to create a positive community you can lean on for support
  10. Work with your Continuing Care Specialist to prepare a reliable aftercare program for when you return home or enroll in a sober living program

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Featured photo by Frank Vessia

The Four Causes of Addiction

The Four Causes to Addiction

There are only four causes of all addiction. It may seem as if there are hundreds, but there are only four.  You have quit many times, only to relapse, even if there were long periods of sobriety. What draws you inexorably back is the unresolved conditions produced by one or more of the four causes listed below. As you read the list of examples, write down the numbers of the ones that apply to you. When you are finished, email the numbers to us: passages@evaluation.com  Include your contact information and we will get back to you promptly and tell you what we can do to help end your addiction. It is certain you have an unresolved Cause. It is nearly certain you have forgotten the original cause because of the pain, the shame, the sadness or the hurt you experienced when you remembered it when it was still fresh. Or you may even remember it, but do not credit it with causing and keeping alive your current addiction. You may have examples we haven’t listed; add those to your list. Regarding neurotransmitter imbalance, there’s no need to list it as everyone who has an addiction to drugs, including alcohol, has a neurotransmitter imbalance.

The Four Broad Categories

1A Neurotransmitter imbalance

       2B Events of the past you have not been able to reconcile.

       3C Current conditions you can’t cope with.

4D Things you believe that aren’t true.

A Brief Description of The Four Causes

Cause 1A

1A Neurotransmitter imbalance. In the first 3 ½ years after we opened Passages, everyone who came was given an electroencephalograph exam (EEG). The psychiatrist who administered the EEG testing is one of the foremost psychiatrists in EEG testing. Each client had eight electrodes placed on the top of his or her head to read electrical impulses from the surface of their brain. We read their brain waves for fifteen minutes, then took the quietest ten seconds, when the brain was at its most restful state, and processed it through our computer where we had the baseline from New York University. There was not one person whose brain wave patterns were within the normal range. We discovered that those people who had fast brain wave patterns were using drugs marijuana, opiates and alcohol in an attempt to slow themselves down and feel normal. Those who had slow brain wave patterns were using speed drugs: cocaine, Adderall, methamphetamine, Ritalin, and caffeine. Everyone was seeking a drug that made them feel normal or balanced.

Cause 2B

Events of the past you haven’t been able to reconcile. Life brings us challenges. Some of the challenges are painful, demoralizing, identity crushing, unbearable, humiliating, shameful, depressing, mentally disturbing and they all cause trauma that can live in our brain forever causing us great pain both mental and physical. If the trauma and pain are substantial enough, the memories are stamped indelibly on our brain and in some cases, in our muscle tissue. Many years may pass, but the memories are still there, buried in your subconscious, hurting all your days. One of the most beneficial attributes of a human being is the ability to forget. Whenever the images of the painful trauma emerge, we block it in an attempt to ease the pain. After a while, the event is buried. The memory of it is still there, but our recall system has shut it down from everyday consciousness; yet it is still there, subliminally causing us to medicate ourselves with drugs and alcohol particularly when the same traumatic feeling you experienced during the original trauma are felt again, even though they may not trigger a memory of the original event.  Left to continue its disruptive action, we either suffer or medicate the pain away, unaware of the cause. As you read the examples, write down the numbers of the ones that apply to you and email them to us at

  • B1 Sexually Abused at any time or multiple times.
  • B2 Physically abused as a child
  • B3 Physically abused at any time
  • B4 Victim of bullying
  • Verbal abuse – being yelled at, called names
  • Emotional Abuse – is defined as “stupid” or “wrong”
  • Shamed for being shy
  • Shamed for Self-Expression
  • Shamed for your sexuality
  • Narcissistic abuse
  • Seeing violence occur in your home even if you did not experience it
  • Being introduced to porn or snuff films at a young age by a parent or sibling or babysitter
  • Made to feel like a failure i.e. “You’ll never amount to anything.”
  • Being told they were not wanted “I wish I had an abortion”
  • “I wanted a girl.”
  • “I wanted a boy.”
  • Being told you ruined your parents’ lives
  • Being criticized for your appearance – “too fat, too thin, too ugly, pimples, a deformity.”
  • Being raised in a cult with frightening rituals and practices
  • Overly critical parents
  • Being a victim of parent ‘kidnapping” – one parent kept you from the other
    • Ignored by family
    • Ignored by siblings
    • Abandoned by a parent or parents as a child
    • No listened to or understood
    • Emotionally unavailable parents
    • Made to feel unsafe
    • Not receiving protection from the non-abusive parent
    • Emotionally disconnected parents/family
    • Being raised by a mentally ill parent
    • Absentee Parents
    • Absence of positive role models
    • Sent away to live somewhere else
    • Lack of approval.
    • Not allowed to pursue your interests
    • Not allowed to pursue one’s choice in education or career
    • Severe poverty and conditions
    • Being lost in a large family
    • Lack of affection from parents and siblings
  • Parent’s Divorce
  • Family Addiction
  • Being the scapegoat in your Family
  • Too strict parents
  • Too lenient parents
  • incest
  • No structure in your family
  • Sibling rivalry
  • Not measuring up to family expectations
  • Being made to act as the parent to the parent instead of being allowed to be a child
  • Infantilized by Parents – not allowed to grow up
  • Unresolved grief over the death of a parent
  • Unresolved grief over the death of a sibling
  • A single parent with multiple sexual partners
  • Abuse by a stepmother
  • Abuse by a stepfather
  • Death of a primary caregiver when you were a child
  • Constant Conflict between parents or family members
  • You were adopted
  • Uprooted, frequent relocations
  • Having a long-term illness as a child
  • Loss of a job
  • Unfair judgment put on you.
  • Kept back a grade or multiple grades in school
  • Unfair treatment in school
  • Missed opportunity
  • Passed over for promotion
  • Filing for bankruptcy
  • Failed business
  • Early success and accomplishments, then failure
  • Loss of health
  • Loss of a close relationship
  • Loss of reputation
  • Loss of purpose
  • Loss of dreams
  • Moving to a new area
  • Unhappy marriage (the ideal not being fulfilled)
  • Childbirth problems
  • Adoption
  • Empty Nest (children moved away)
  • Diagnosed with a learning disability
  • Unable to achieve education
  • mid-life crisis
  • Aging process
  • Losing identity/sense of self to being a wife and mother
  • Severe accidents
  • Suicide (by loved one or attempt on one’s own life)
  • Death of loved one
  • Abortion
  • Victim of a Crime of Violence
  • Victim of a natural disaster
  • Divorce
  • Betrayal
  • Scandal, public humiliation
  • Loss of custody of children
  • Death of a child
  • Degenerative illness
  • Injury or disabled
  • War experience
  • Chronic pain
  • Being brought up in the foster care system
  • Being robbed or taken advantage of by a friend or family member
  • Loss of a family pet

3C

Current conditions you can’t cope with.  We all experience stress in one form or another. When stress reaches a level we can’t tolerate, instead of working on ways to reduce the stress either by eliminating the cause or moderating it with calming techniques, we turn to medications for relief. Here are some of the conditions:

  • C1 Unbearable physical pain from a car accident, workplace accident, or a bad fall
  • C2 An illness such a Chron’s Disease, hyper or hypothyroid, HIV, or liver cirrhosis which causes uncomfortable symptoms like mood swings, insomnia, anxiety, or depression.
  • C3 Recent diagnoses with a mental illness
  • C4 Body dysmorphia (Imagined physical defects)
  • Lack of coping strategies
  • A home environment not supportive
  • Passive suicidal ideation
  • Cannot manage life emotionally
  • Lack of life purpose
  • Lacks insight – poor insight into anger or anxiety
  • Balance of work, life, play
  • Lack of support
  • Not taking responsibility
  • being out of touch with self and others
  • Interpersonal conflict and stress
  • Absence of flexibility, difficulties with change
  • Difficulties in regulating emotions
  • Difficulty accepting reality as it is
  • OCD-Having obsessive thoughts
  • Detachment – all the aforementioned such as childhood abuse, trauma, or loss, lack of love can cause us to detach as a survival mechanism. This behavior can stay with us throughout our entire lives and can go unrecognized for many years.
  • in an unhealthy relationship or relationships
  • spouse/family member still using drugs or alcohol
  • returning to the same unhealthy environment after treatment
  • Stress from returning to work or starting a new job
  • Loved one passing away
  • lack of coping skills
  • feelings of unacceptance
  • feelings of low worth and low self- esteem
  • Falling away from support or whatever helps them from not relapsing; i.e. church supportive friends, exercising)
  • Lack of focus,
  • mental noise; scattered thoughts of no consequence.
  • struggling with decision making, overthinking, can’t make up their mind, uncertainty confusion about how to move forward and which path to choose,
  • unable to commit, procrastination.
  • Self-shame
  • Fear of not being good enough.
  • Fear of being alone,
  • Fear of dying,
  • fear of rejection
  • Fear of the future
  • Lack of self-trust or belief, not fitting in with family’s conditions
  • Doesn’t like job/career
  • Self-critical/judgmental
  • Negative self-talk
  • Feeling lost
  • Purposeless
  • Unhappy with Physical self-image
  • Can’t accept the aging process
  • Regrets or angry at their past
  • Hyper Sensitive to energy due to their childhood traumas
  • Lack of spirituality
  • Being disappointed with yourself for not achieving your life’s goals
  • No support system
  • Toxic environment
  • One I hear of frequently changes in life role- having to take on care of aging parents, having older children return home, etc. frequently it also has to do with forcing bad relationships to work (whether these are romantic, friendship, or family) and failing to enact healthy boundaries.
  • Change in work status (up or down) some promotions cause people to feel they may not deserve the promotion and self-sabotage, conversely being demoted, laid off, or outright fired is devastating to self-esteem.
  • Change of residence. moving cities can unbalance someone. Change of countries, even change of homes can cause one to feel unbalanced for a time triggering abuse.
  • Divorce or ending a relationship. Or simply a development of conflict within the relationship.  Death of a family member. Death of a child.  Abortion.
  • Empty nest syndrome I am seeing this a lot more recently where the primary caretaker usually the mother lacks life purpose after the children are grown and starts drinking a lot more
  • Being in the “sandwich” between aging parents and the needs of their children. 
  • Relationships are a very common one, marriages, family, judgment from both
  • High-stress jobs/careers or unhappy with a job/career.
  • Being unable to identify their path in life, finding purpose, and joy.
  • I am part of my family business and they want me to be something I am not.
  • My job is very stressful, I work nonstop many hours per day. 
  • I cannot find my place in this society. I feel out of it
  • My head does not stop. I have thousands of thoughts.
  • lack of lifestyle and balance
  • legal issues
  • chronic pain
  • unemployment
  • not feeling financially stable and still dependent on family or spouse
  • unable to rely on family or spouse because they have passed away or abandoned me
  • insomnia
  • Out of work
  • Financial worries
  • Loneliness
  • Boredom
  • Bad marriage
  • Bad relationships
  • Problems with children
  • Special needs children
  • A general feeling of dissatisfaction with life
  • Feeling stuck
  • Custody battles
  • Co-parenting issues
  • Aging parents requiring care
  • Doubting their sexuality
  • Unsure whether to come out or not
  • In a physically abusive relationship
  • Anxious disorder
  • Medical diagnosis
  • Aging process
  • Unexpected natural disasters
  • Lack of a rewarding social circle
  • Lack of family support
  • Raising a child
  • Being forced to be a part of the family business instead of pursuing their own dreams
  • Working non-stop many hours per day
  • Can’t find their place in society
  • Racing mind, thoughts do not stop
  • Divorce or failing marriage
  • Business decline or bankruptcy
  • Return of older children to the home
  • Lack of intimacy in marriage
  • The difference in parenting styles leading to conflict
  • Poor health
  • Fertility problems
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Menopause
  • School pressures
  • Work/Life balance
  • Lack of friends
  • Spouse’s physical, mental, health issues
  • Raising a special needs child
  • Dealing with teenage/adult children’s own drug or alcohol abuse
  • Adult children being financially dependent and the stress that comes with
  • Raising grandchildren
  • Caring for elderly parents
  • Dealing with and treating an eating disorder
  • General dysfunctional family dynamics
  • Affairs
  • Partners who abuse
  • Conflict with family members
  • Homelessness
  • Isolation
  • Lack of purpose
  • Physical pain
  • Phobias
  • Undiagnosed mental illness
  • Probation/jail time
  • Failing business
  • Failing marriage
  • Unresolved issues in a multi-generational family business
  • Loss from natural disasters
  • Death of a family member or loved one
  • Delabializing illness
  • Diet
  • Inability to control their finances or budget
  • Children with disabilities
  • Lack of job skills
  • Lack of education
  • Lack of self-sufficiency
  • Numerous attempts in treatment or to get sober
  • Standard of living
  • Poor tolerance for discomfort
  • Career dissatisfaction
  • Failing mental capacity as they age
  • Lack of awareness of personal beliefs
  • Dominant family member

4D

Things we believe that aren’t true. What we believe to be true about the world in which we live and about ourselves May not be what is actually true. Some of it we learn from parents, some from teachers or friends or things we read or see in the media. What we believe to be true shapes our actions, our thoughts and indeed our very lives. Here are some examples:

  • D1 I am worthless
    • D2 I am a disappointment
    • D3 I will never be free of my drug of choice
    • D4 One week of treatment and I am ready to go home
    • I can still drink socially or use marijuana without leading to a relapse
    • I am cursed
    • I have done something wrong in past lives
    • I have no control
    • I am too dumb to learn new skills
    • Life is not worth trying
    • My teacher/ mother/ father/ pastor/ priest said I would never amount to anything
    • It’s genetic and out of my control
    • Anger. Much of the time. Unreasonable anger. Quick to anger. Uncontrollable anger.
    • “Not being honest about the treatment they need”
    • I can go on vacation and drink or use and not have it affect me
    • Remembering when using was “fun” in the beginning and only romanticizing it
    • Judgments from family members
    • “I’m not good enough”
    • “No one cares about me”
    • “I don’t deserve to be loved “
    • “I don’t deserve anything good in my life because I hurt so many people”
    • “I’m a failure”
    • “I don’t believe I can change”
    • “Staying sober is impossible”
    • “Being sober is boring”
    • These are frequently inherited or misinterpreted messages from childhood, ex: your sister was the smart one, no one expects much from you, you’ll never succeed because of x, y, or z
    • A belief that the person is entitled to a life free from pain and discomfort. (we are sold this on TV “ask your Dr. if this drug is right for you.
    • The belief that they are damaged goods. essentially tragically flawed, like “I’m an alcoholic.” 
    • The belief that they cannot change
    • The belief that they are trapped by obligation or circumstances
    • The belief that their life has no meaning.
    • Spiritual emptiness
    • Due to most past trauma, a lot of clients believe they are in fact worthless, this is very common with addiction.
    • The other big one, of course, is the incurable disease theory…the shame and guilt of it cause most clients to put off seeking help sooner. 
    • I am not good enough
    • I am not worthy enough,
    • I am not capable enough to go through this
    • The world is unsafe, and no one is to be trusted
    • The only way to deal with my emotions is to numb them with alcohol and drugs
    • Alcohol/drugs are a part of my identity and the only way I fit in
    • I will never live up to expectations
    • Everything is my fault
    • I was abused because I deserved it
    • I am unlovable
    • I’ve made so many mistakes, I will never be able to repair them
    • I will never succeed
    • I am not pretty enough, good enough, smart enough
    • I am helpless
    • I am powerless
    • I am alone
    • I will never be happy
    • The only way to deal with pain is drugs
    • My situation will never improve
    • I am not worth the expense of treatment
    • I am unforgivable
    • I can only get sober through will power and self-determination
    • I am owed something (sense of entitlement)
    • The whole world is against me
    • Drugs and alcohol give me the energy to get things done
    • Getting wasted is a rite of passage
    • I don’t have the opportunities that others have
    • I don’t deserve happiness
    • I am stupid
    • I have been using for as long as I can remember so I don’t think I can live life without it
    • No One expects much from me
    • I won’t ever have fun again if I’m sober
    • Taking care of myself is selfish
    • I’m too old to change
    • People won’t like me if I’m sober
    • I will always need medications for pain/anxiety
    • I won’t ever be happy
    • I can’t do it
    • I can’t survive without this relationship
    • I need extreme stimulation
    • I perform better on drugs
    • My feelings are facts
    • My value comes from the approval of others
    • It feels normal to live in chaos
    • It is not going to happen to me (negative consequences)
    • It is not me but everyone else who has the issues
    • It is in my genetic background to be an addict
    • I have ADHD and cocaine helps me focus
    • I have anxiety and it can only be managed with Xanax
    • 1 month of treatment and I’m ready
    • Nothing matters anymore
    • My addiction is a disease that is incurable
    • I am no longer able to change or grow as a person
    • I need to be smarter/more successful/better than I am
    • Refusing to engage in the world keeps me safe
    • I have already ruined my life and relationships, so I can’t stop now
    • Drugs and alcohol give me the warmth and comfort I can’t get anywhere else
    • I will never find love and acceptance from people who don’t use
    • There are no consequences to using
    • I can safely use
    • My talent is based on my substance abuse

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Passages vs 12 Step Rehabs

For many years the addiction rehabilitation industry was solely based on 12 Step principles, such as group meetings, indirect healing practices, and reciting the imprisoning phrase, “Once an addict, always an addict.” That was until Passages’ opened it’s doors in 2001 and began to experience 360 degree healing from the core of each and every individual who was dedicated to breaking free from substance abuse related issues. Here are the major differences between Passages Rehab Centers and 12 Step based treatment centers.

12-step: Says that alcoholism and addiction are diseases.

Passages: Does not believe that alcoholism and addiction are diseases.

12-step: Says that the disease of drug addiction and the disease of alcohol addiction are incurable.

Passages: Says that addiction to drugs and alcohol is caused by one or more of Four Causes that can be treated and healed.

12-step: Says that in order to remain sober you must go to 12-Step meetings for the rest of your life and have a sponsor with whom you communicate regularly.

Passages: Says that every individual can remain sober without meetings and without sponsors by healing the underlying causes that keep the addiction alive and active.  

12-step: Says that you require help from a higher power to get sober.

Passages: Says that sobriety can be maintained by anyone, even those who do not believe in a higher power.

12-step: Asks you to admit that you are powerless over drugs and alcohol.

Passages: Chris and Pax Prentiss encourage you to believe that you have strength and determination to end your addiction to drugs and alcohol by finding out which of the Four Causes created your addiction and is keeping it alive and active.

12-step: To speak at an AA meeting, it is required that you identify yourself as an addict or alcoholic.

Passages: Believes that it is detrimental in the extreme to identify yourself as an addict or alcoholic.

Passages Non-12 Step Rehab | (888) 397-0112

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Customized Addiction Therapy at Passages Rehab

Customized Addiction Treatment Program at Passages Rehab

By Jennifer McDougall

Being treated for substance abuse-related issues at Passages Malibu is the start of something beautiful. Anyone who has struggled to get and stay sober knows how challenging this process is. That is why at Passages, we are fully committed to providing our clients with the best possible therapy available that best suits their needs, by customizing a state-of-the-art addiction treatment program.

Our non-12 Step and holistic addiction therapy offers more one-on-one sessions than many other programs out there today. We know how crucial it is for an individual to get the proper attention and professional care so they can begin to feel empowered, heal, and thrive.

Here is what our treatment at Passages Malibu includes:

INDIVIDUAL TREATMENT

GROUP TREATMENT

MEDICAL CARE

The treatment at Passages is exceptionally stellar beyond measure. Many treatment centers claim to offer what Passages offers, but they don’t come close. Here is what makes our addiction treatment center so unique:

  • Individual Therapy: At least 14 to 19 individual sessions per week, depending on your program – this is far more than any other treatment center offers
  • 24/7 Nursing: Registered, on-site nursing staff to attend to your medical needs
  • A professionally trained and experienced treatment team including various addiction experts, doctors, and licensed therapists
  • Freedom to use cell phones and laptops: Stay connected to family and business during your treatment
  • Advanced holistic therapy methods: Each customized to meet your individual needs, taking into consideration the specific aspects of your addiction
  • Immaculate grounds and bedrooms create a perfect atmosphere for healing and relaxation
  • Family owned and operated – Providing reliable and trustworthy addiction treatment services since 2001

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

The Secret of Your Addiction is Within You

The Secret of Your Addiction is Within You

By Chris Prentiss

The secret of what has caused and is keeping your addiction alive and active, making it seemingly impossible for you to quit, is within you.

Learning the techniques of relapse recovery is important; learning a new philosophy of life and how to live it is important; discovering the triggers that lead to relapse and being in treatment with other people who are at Passages for the same purpose as you is important, but, if we don’t find out which of the Four Causes created and is keeping your addiction alive and heal it, relapse is pretty much certain; we will both fail. And make no mistake, when you fail, we fail. We want to hear your story. We need to hear your story; the real one; and you need to tell it. We’ll help you look for it. Looking for it is number one on the list of things we do best. Number two is to help you process what we find so it stops keeping your addiction alive. Come to us prepared to let your guard down and talk to your therapists openly with complete protection for your confidentiality. Together, we can end your addiction. Our therapists are experts in leading you to the secret you’re holding on to. You’re not holding onto it deliberately, but because it’s painful you’ve buried it.

You are not to blame for your addiction, for what you’re going through; Your addiction is being caused by one or more of the Four Causes.

Don’t come to Passages and go home with your secret still locked inside of you.

Most of our clients have forgotten their original cause because it’s too painful, too shameful, too traumatic, too embarrassing. The relief they experience when the cause is remembered and healed is one of the best feelings in the world. That’s the moment you will know you’ve escaped your addiction. We have seen thousands of clients experience that moment.

If you haven’t already read the Four Causes Page, do it now. If you’ve already read it, read it again. Make sure you’ve checked off all the examples that apply to you. Then, click on the “Evaluation” button so we can tell you what we will do to help you be free from them. That’s the start. You may not know the original cause; that’s usually the case, but it’s the start that leads to the finish, to the real source; the cause. We will be there with you, all the way. We can win together, but you hold the key, the secret. So, talk to us…

Chris Prentiss, Co-Founder, and President of Passages Addiction Treatment Centers

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Trauma Therapy at Passages Malibu

Trauma Therapy at Passages Malibu

by Jennifer McDougall

When an individual experiences trauma it is crucial they receive professional therapy, such as what is offered at Passages Addiction Treatment Centers. When trauma goes unhealed, a person may carry around the baggage of their pain everywhere they go and into relationships, their career, and in many cases- increased risk of substance abuse related issues. At Passages Malibu, our certified therapists use cognitive behavior therapy to help individuals heal from mental and emotional trauma. When the weight of remorse and pain is lifted, major improvements in overall wellbeing can be felt and seen. There is hope for anyone who has experienced trauma.

Through a variety of holistic therapy methods such as mindful meditation, acupuncture, psychotherapy, hypnotherapy, and yoga, Passages Malibu makes it possible to help a person heal from trauma-related issues that have caused them to turn to drugs and alcohol as a coping mechanism. We are confident in the treatment we provide and urge you to reach out for help if you or a loved one is experiencing a drug or alcohol related issue.

Trauma Therapy at Passages Malibu
Passages Malibu Addiction Rehab Center

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

For additional resources, please read: Passages Malibu Alcohol Rehab

Surprising Benefits of Sobriety

By Jennifer McDougall

Imagine for a second the perfect life. Imagine yourself living as your most healthy, stable, and spiritual self. This reality is possible when being healing from the underlying causes of your drug and alcohol addiction related issues. At Passages, we provide holistic therapy for substance abuse related issues that have helped save and change the lives of thousands of people from all over the world.

Getting sober is one of the best and healthiest choices you may ever make in your life. Many people don’t how much sobriety can help improve the quality of your life and your overall health. For those who are living in denial of a drug or alcohol addiction, it will take a lot of convincing but we have seen people of all walks of life finally come to their senses and decide to get the help they need. The transformations are incredible. You too can experience great transformation.

At Passages Addiction Treatment Centers, we focus on healing the mind, body, and spirit. When someone is addicted to substances, their destructive patterns deeply affect relationships, career, finances, physical appearance and so much more. If you have ever had to witness someone you love suffer from a drug or alcohol addiction you know how painful it is- to see someone you care about destroy their body and their life. If you are that person who is self-destructing through the use of drugs and alcohol, we want to encourage you to call Passages today at (888) 397-0112.

Rather than labeling you an addict or an alcoholic, at Passages we choose to encourage and empower you. Our team of professional addiction specialists are trained and certified in utilizing the most effective methods of therapy to help treat and heal the underlying conditions causing a person to use and abuse addictive substances.

Here are 10 of the biggest changes you may notice when you decide to get clean and sober:

  1. Ability to save more money and spend smarter without the disruption of intoxicated decision making and financial hangovers.
  2. Improved interpersonal relationships and the ability to make stronger connections to others on a deeper and more meaningful level than before.
  3. Stable career thanks to the lack of a physical, mental, and emotional hangover brought on previously from drugs and alcohol.
  4. Increased energy and motivation to take better care of yourself.
  5. Skin complexion drastically improves without the consumption of harmful chemicals found in drug and alcohol products.
  6. Cleaner and more respectable living spaces thanks to the lack of a mess that is typically created when a person is drunk or high. Also, when you are sober and living a healthy lifestyle, you may take up new decor or decide to rearrange your furniture.
  7. Enjoyment in things you are actually passionate about rather than going out and drinking and not making good use of your time and abilities. You may notice yourself having even more fun than you did before when you were drinking and using drugs.
  8. Discovery of mental clarity and inner peace.
  9. Get a better night sleep, every night.
  10. Long term health improvements that will have you living a healthy life without the use of drugs and alcohol.

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Will Insurance Cover My Treatment at Passages Rehab

Will Insurance Cover My Treatment at Passages Rehab

Passages Addiction Treatment Centers opened it’s doors in 2001 to help those struggling with substance abuse related issues. Many people don’t realize that Passages accepts most private insurance policies to help cover the cost of treatment. Visit www.PassagesInsurance.com to fill out our confidential insurance form and one of our admissions counselors with contact you with a free quote. 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers for Additional Information:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Inspirational Quotes for Addiction Recovery

Inspirational Quotes for Addiction Recovery

When you are in need of inspiration in your recovery from drug and alcohol dependency related issues, these quotes by Chris Prentiss will help lift your spirits and give you some wonderful insight to ease your mind.

“You are not an alcoholic or an addict. You are not incurably diseased. You have merely become dependent on substances or addictive behavior to cope with underlying conditions that you are now going to heal, at which time your dependency will cease completely and forever.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure

“If you examine your motive for doing anything, you’ll soon discover that your reason is that you believe it will make you happy.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“At the bottom of every person’s dependency, there is always pain, Discovering the pain and healing it is an essential step in ending dependency.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“Each river is different, but they all eventually lead to the ocean. No matter what we’re doing or when, or whether it brings us happiness or remorse, gain or loss, we’re all on our individual paths to enlightenment. Even when we’ve done something we consider wrong, we’re still on our path to enlightenment.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Zen and the Art of Happiness


“Who you allow into the circle of your life will make the difference in the quality of your life.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Zen and the Art of Happiness


“Alcohol and drugs are not the problems; they are what people are using to help themselves cope with the problems. Those problems always have both physical and psychological components- anything from anemia, hypoglycemia, or a sluggish thyroid to attention deficient disorder, brain-wave pattern imbalances, or deep emotional pain.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“The best way for you to get that new experience is to change your response to what happens.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Zen and the Art of Happiness


“It’s the causes, not the dependent person, that must be corrected. That’s why I see the United States’ War on Drugs as being fought in an unrealistic manner. This war is focused on fighting drug dealers and the use of drugs here and abroad, when the effort should be primarily aimed at treating and curing that causes that compel people to reach for drugs.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“If you are surrounded by people who not only don’t believe in your goals and your positive outlook on life, but who also continually try to tear you down, it will be extremely challenging for you to hold firmly in mind that you will succeed and that you can be happy.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Zen and the Art of Happiness


“When you need an idea about how to do anything, get quiet and relaxed and think about what it is you need to know. Then the flow of ideas will come. Be patient and let it happen. Sometimes it takes a little while, but it always works.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Be Who You Want, Have What You Want: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life


“The more you engage in any type of emotion or behavior, the greater your desire for it will become.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Zen and the Art of Happiness


“Think about the stigma that is attached to the idea that alcoholism is a disease, an incurable illness, and you have it. That’s a terrible thing to inflict on someone. Labeling alcoholism as a disease, a cause unto itself, simply no longer fits with what we know today about its causes.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“When a problem or a difficult situation arises, say to yourself, as if you already believe it: “This is for my benefit.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Be Who You Want, Have What You Want: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life


“People who are dependent are merely using alcohol as a crutch to get through the day. Yet doctors and scientists are still treating “alcoholism” as if it is the problem, when it has nothing to do with the problem. They might as well be studying “scratchism” for people who have a chronic itch.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“We recognize that you’ve used substances to try to regain your lost balance, to try to feel the way you did before the need arose to use addictive drugs or alcohol. We know that you use substances to alter your mood, to cover up your sadness, to ease your heartbreak, to lighten your stress load, to blur your painful memories, to escape your hurtful reality, or to make your unbearable days or nights bearable.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“…there is a saying used in twelve-step programs and in most treatment centers that “Relapse is part of recovery.” It’s another dangerous slogan that is based on a myth, and it only gives people permission to relapse because they think that when they do, they are on the road to recovery.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“To give up power to change for the better is inherently distasteful to everyone, and to force people to affirm that they are addicts or alcoholics so they can speak in a meeting is shameful and demoralizing.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“Whether the underlying cause of your dependency is a chemical imbalance, unresolved events from the past, beliefs you hold that are inconsistent with what is true, an inability to cope with current conditions, or a combination of these four causes, know this: not only are all the causes of dependency within you, but all the solutions are within you as well.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“The true source of happiness is within each of us.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Zen and the Art of Happiness


“Take a few minutes now and see your current circumstances- your physical condition, your emotional condition, your possessions, your financial condition, where and how you live, your relationships, the situations surrounding your life, and the way you believe other people see you- as mirrors showing you “Who You Are.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Be Who You Want, Have What You Want: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life


“A relationship is like a garden. To create a condition that will cause your plants to thrive and produce abundantly, you must weed, water, fertilize, and care for the plants in your garden. You must also know about the special needs of the plants you’re caring for. Some need more or less light than others, some need more or less water than others, and some need special fertilizers.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Laws of Love: Creating the Relationship of Your Dreams


“If those underlying conditions aren’t treated, the return of those symptoms may cause us so much discomfort that we’ll go back to using addictive drugs or alcohol to obtain relief. That’s the primary reason there is such a high rate of relapse among people who have become dependent of alcohol and addictive drugs. It has little to do with alcohol and addiction themselves and almost everything to do with the original causes that created the dependency.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“The world is actually a mirror, and as you change, you will see everything around you changing as well, mirroring your changes.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Be Who You Want, Have What You Want: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life


“What we call coincidences, accidental and remarkable events occurring at the same time, are actually circumstances and events that have come into your life to serve a purpose is to benefit you.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Be Who You Want, Have What You Want: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life


“When you change the way you see and interpret events, suddenly everything will be different for you. Everything will make sense.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Be Who You Want, Have What You Want: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life


“We know that you don’t want to be a drunk and you don’t want to be hooked on addictive drugs. You do it because you can’t cope with your life without some sort of support, even if that support is damaging.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“The events that occur in my life are workout situations. They are there for my benefit so I can become strong and gain wisdom and information by working my way through those situations.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Be Who You Want, Have What You Want: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life


“How do you think your body and mind would respond if you were surrounded by psychologists, psychiatrists, or drug and alcohol counselors who subscribed to the belief that “once an alcoholic or addict, always an alcoholic or addict” and who believed that your current stay in rehab would be one of many?” 
― Chris Prentiss, Zen and the Art of Happiness


“Negative emotions, like depression or anxiety, have been shown to affect our immune system. Stress impedes wound healing.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Be Who You Want, Have What You Want: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life


“If you feel depressed for an hour, you’ve produced approximately eighteen billion new cells that have more receptors calling out for depressed-type peptides and fewer calling out for feel-good peptides.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Zen and the Art of Happiness


“When you imagine yourself as a failure or as having insurmountable problems in your relationships or any part of your life, you think failure, act failure, and produce failure.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Laws of Love: Creating the Relationship of Your Dreams


“A diminished self-image will cause you to slouch, to avoid meeting others, to avoid looking others in the eye, to be unassertive, and to be indecisive.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Laws of Love: Creating the Relationship of Your Dreams

“From this moment forward, I am in control of every situation. I will always know the exact right action to take, and this is so. I will now obtain vibrant good health. I will have the possessions I want, I now have the power and wisdom to bring this about, and this is so. I will have peace and harmony in my life. I will have love and abundance, and this is so. I now claim all these things for my own from this time forward.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Laws of Love: Creating the Relationship of Your Dreams


“If who you are and what you have is what you want, that’s perfect. Keep doing what you’ve been doing and you’ll get more of it.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Be Who You Want, Have What You Want: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life


“Trustworthy partners always think first before they do anything that may affect either the reputation or well-being of each other.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Laws of Love: Creating the Relationship of Your Dreams


“We help our clients discover and correct the underlying conditions that are causing them to self-medicate, to seek relief in substances and addictive behavior.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Laws of Love: Creating the Relationship of Your Dreams


“Do you believe in chaos- in random, uncontrolled events, in the idea that anything can happen at any time without fixed laws governing it? If you believe that, you will always be in a state of fear, not knowing what will happen from one moment to the next. The fear might be small, but it is there. That fear results in a lack of security and a feeling of mistrust.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Laws of Love: Creating the Relationship of Your Dreams


“Most centers offer a one-program-fits all type of service, which is rather like a department store that sells one-size fits all clothing.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“In the one-treatment-fits-all approach, clients sit in group meetings all day and all evening and listen to each other stories. At the end of the first week, everyone in the room knows everyone’s story. That goes on for three more weeks, and then most people go home with the same problems they brought with them when they arrived.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“Staying sober is easy once you have been successful in healing the underlying conditions that were responsible for your dependency in the first place.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure


“If you have experienced recurring situations in your life that are unpleasant, know that there is something you are supposed to be getting from those situations that you have not been getting and that the moment you get it, those situations will pass out of your life, not to return.” 
― Chris Prentiss, Be Who You Want, Have What You Want: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life

“If I were to create a word that more accurately describes alcoholism and addiction, I would say it was dependencyism. Sounds silly, doesn’t it? Yet it’s no sillier than the word alcoholism. The reason alcoholism no longer sounds silly to you is because you’re used to hearing it, reading it, and thinking about it.” 
― Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure

How Addiction Effects Other Family Members

How Addiction Affects the Entire Family

By Jennifer McDougall

Addiction takes a toll on the whole family. It can be hard watching someone you love self-destruct and bring harm to themselves as they divulge in substance abuse. Maybe you are experiencing something similar in your family. There’s no easy way to address these issues to someone is abusing drugs and alcohol because chances are they are in denial and refuse to admit there is any problem present, regardless of how obvious it is to you.

Growing up with an addicted family member can put a strain on family bonds, causing immense stress during the holidays and any other family get-togethers. One may even experience physical, mental, or emotional abuse from a loved one addicted to drugs and alcohol. Growing up under these conditions, no matter how old or how many years pass the trauma and pain lie there somewhere under the surface. It important to remain aware of the conditions in which you are living in and experiencing so that you can create boundaries from the effects brought on by addiction-related pain.

The important thing to remember is that this person or family member who is over-indulging or abusing drugs and alcohol is doing so because of their own underlying conditions and unresolved problems. This is not your fault and sometimes no matter how hard you try or what you do, the one suffering needs to be ready to be the treatment they need to fully recover from substance abuse.

If you have an addicted family member, you know the heartwrenching feeling of mistrust, betrayal, and a lack of confidence when it comes to relying on that individual.

Affects on Family Ties

  • Overall negative environment causing everyone around to feel weighed down and irritable
  • Increased stress for all members of the family
  • Broken communication adding to more arguments and disagreements
  • Cause of reversed roles (children becoming the caretakers of an addicted parent or family member)
  • Abusive situations that are brought on by substance abuse 
  • Financial troubles from bad spending habits, job loss, or poor judgment
  • Embarrassment for other family members dealing with an addicted parent, spouse or sibling
  • Conflicts between all family members and unresolved issues
  • Violence is a likely possibility when drugs or alcohol are present 
  • Cheating on a partner or spouse brought on from poor judgment
  • Increased heal problems in the addicted family member or even a non-addicted family member due to stress from the heartwrenching dynamics
  • Jealousy and resentment of other family members and friends 

Affects on the Children

  • Physical, emotional, mental, and sometimes even sexual abuse
  • Difficulties in intimate relationships later in life
  • They feel guilty or responsible for any issues related to the addicted parent
  • Exhibits general anxiety symptoms, social dysfunctions, insensitivity, PTSD, difficulties coping with stress, and impulsive behaviors 
  • Neediness along with emotional distance and unwillingness to connect to others on a deep on a meaningful level due to fear of rejection or any type of criticism
  • Insecurities when it comes to speaking or behaving amongst other people due to their trouble in understanding what normal is and is not
  • Low self-esteem and self-worth from years of feeling inadequate
  • Trouble trusting other people after one broken promise after another
  • Fear of abandonment due to an absent (emotionally and physically)  mother or father and greater tendency to lock onto unhealthy relationships to avoid being alone
  • The constant need for approval and usually become people pleasers
  • Physiological distress and depression
  • The deep desire for isolation and solitude away from other people especially other family members who they know and feel are toxic for their wellbeing and trigger them very frequently 
  • Self-harm and the indulgence of substance abuse themselves 

Also, read How to Talk to Your Loved One About Going to Rehab

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

Effects of Addiction on the Family
Effects of Addiction on the Family
Drama Therapy & Addiction

Drama Therapy & Addiction

By Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC

“Great theatre is about challenging how we think and encouraging us to fantasize about a world we aspire to” Willem Dafoe

The following is a Q&A provided by the North American Drama Therapy Association (NADTA).

What is Drama Therapy?

NADTA defines drama therapy as the intentional use of drama and/or theater processes to achieve therapeutic goals. Drama therapy is active and experiential.

When applied to addictions populations, drama therapy is especially effective, for it provides chemically dependent clients with an opportunity to safely practice the behaviors necessary for abstinence (North American Drama Therapy Association).

What is the Theoretical Framework?

The theoretical foundation of drama therapy lies in drama, theater, psychology, psychotherapy, anthropology, play, and interactive and creative processes.

How Does Drama Therapy Work?

Through drama, the depth and breadth of inner experience can be actively explored and interpersonal relationship skills can be enhanced. Participants can expand their repertoire of dramatic roles to find that their own life roles have been strengthened.

What Types of Techniques are used?

Processes and techniques may include improvisation, theater games, storytelling, and enactment. Many drama therapists make use of text, performance, or ritual to enrich the therapeutic and creative process.

What are the Benefits of Drama Therapy?

The process of drama therapy is both insightful and enjoyable. By engaging in drama therapy, chemically dependent clients learn that they can have fun without being high. This approach can provide the context for participants to tell their stories, set goals and solve problems, express feelings, or achieve catharsis. It results in increased self-esteem and self-awareness, improved communication and interpersonal skills, a better understanding of oneself and others’ perspectives.

Who Can Benefit from Drama Therapy?

Anyone can benefit from drama therapy. Because addicted individuals tend to be sensitive and creative people, they take quickly to the arts and thrive on being able to express themselves through movement, art, words, music, and drama.

Selected resources

The North American Drama Therapy Association (NADTA) is a non-profit association incorporated in 1979 to establish and uphold high standards of professional competence and ethics among drama therapists; to develop criteria for training and registration; to sponsor publications and conferences, and to promote the profession of drama therapy through information and advocacy.

For more information visit North American Drama Therapy Association

Video: Drama Therapy Channel: Healthy Relationship Workshop

At Passages Malibu, our philosophy offers a genuine solution to end your addiction permanently. You deserve something different. Something better. Something that works. Call now to learn more about our addiction treatment modalities and treatment programs (888) 920-8849.

Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC is an educator, published researcher, and social media consultant. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC) (e-therapy) and Suicide Prevention Instructor (QPR) under the National Board for Certified Counselors.

 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Overcoming Addiction for Good: Finding Peace at Passages

Overcoming Addiction: Finding Peace at Passages

By Dr. Kerri Heath

“Reserving judgment is a matter of infinite hope.”

-F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

I love visiting Passages in Malibu, as it brings a sense of peaceful re-centering every time I visit.  The beautiful ocean views and perfectly groomed landscaping create the context, but it is the warm personalities that makes it feel like a home.  This makes Passages a very unique place.  It feels like the Prentiss family has opened up their home for addicts to come in and find solace, a place of refuge.

People who struggle with addiction are searching for peace. According to the philosophy at Passages, substances are used to cover up one or more of following: chemical imbalance, unresolved events from the past, beliefs you hold that are inconsistent with what is true, and an inability to cope with current conditions.  People think they are coming to Passages to heal an addiction, but what they are really seeking is peace and that is what they leave with.

It is no coincidence that the name of the co-owner is Pax, which literally means “peace” in Latin because that seems to be his gift to the world. Pax helps people find true peace in their lives by identifying the real source of pain and offering a variety of solutions to create a better life. I met with Pax on a Thursday afternoon to hear more about his experience and his call to help lead others out of a life of addiction and into a life of peace and happiness. I had already read about his experience in “kicking” addiction, so I knew that I was meeting with a miracle man who was lucky to be alive. People who have come so close to death seem to be laser-focused on things that truly matter (not just material possessions, power, and privilege), and he did not disappoint. Pax was late for our meeting because he ran into a client in the garden who wanted to talk, and that is always a priority to him.  This is the perfect example of how this man makes time for each one of the visitors that come to him for transformation and renewal.

In my brief time with him, I found myself sharing things with him that I have not told others.  I mentioned to him several times “I don’t know why I am telling you this…” to which he replied, “I hear that on a daily basis.”  I am not surprised that his clients find themselves sharing openly and honestly with Pax because he has a true sense of tranquility and unconditional love.  Because of the lack of judgment, people can only find themselves in a safe place to open up, explore and seek honesty in his presence.  One of the greatest things about Passages is that you are invited into a family that honestly cares about you as if you were their own child, because in a way you are.

If you are struggling with addiction, there will come a time when the need for peace far outweighs the need to continue down the path of pain and resistance.  When you want to find the solutions to your problems and a road to recovery, Pax will be there to show you the way.  He has walked the same road and he’s willing, to be honest about it.  And just being in the same room with him will give you the peace that you need to make it through another day.

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Find Your Flow

Overcoming Addiction by Finding Your Flow

By Dr. Kerri Heath

“Being in Flow is a mystical or transcendent state where you go beyond your sense of self and you experience exceptional feats of strength and endurance of creativity.” –Glen Gerreyn

One of the best ways to overcome addiction is to find your flow.  Your flow is the connection you have when your inner life is completely aligned with your external experiences.  When you are suffering internally, your external world becomes chaos, but when you can rebalance your inner life, the external world will reflect your inner contentment. Researchers have been studying the experts who lead happy lives as a result of being in the flow.  The secrets they share can help you find the best version of yourself as well.

Malcolm Gladwell described how to become a true expert at something in his book Outliers (2008) by stating that one practicing anything for 10,000 hours guarantees success.  He was trying to show that natural ability takes an investment of time in order to be made manifest.  This is discouraging for people, like myself, who grow easily distracted and bored.  I prefer to try many different things in life and spending 10,000 doing one thing sounds painful.  However, it takes time to put in the practice at becoming good at something.  If you are reading about addiction, it’s possible that you have spent 10,000 hours drinking or using substances which are lower levels of energy that don’t feel good.  What if you start replacing that time with something that does feel good?

Noting that money cannot make us happy, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi set out to find people who experience lasting satisfaction in activities that bring a state of flow.  When someone is in a state of flow, they are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter, they experience ecstasy.  Every flow activity provides a sense of discovery and a creative feeling that transports the person into a new reality.  Flow pushes people into higher levels of performance and leads to new states of consciousness.  Flow helps you “get in the zone” or experience being “on point” or “on a roll.”  Michael Jackson achieved a state of flow by pushing the boundaries of his brilliance to new heights.

By the time addictions have taken control of your life, you are not able to experience flow that leads to happiness and tranquility. The flow has been blocked by the substances that prevent you from true alignment with your optimal state of being. The state of flow is achieved when you can identify negative emotions and replace them with trying new things, challenging yourself and experiencing new growth. However, you may have become accustomed to using a substance every time a negative emotion arises.  Do not try to eliminate addictions on your own in order to obtain a state of flow but find a team of professionals that can surround you to help you identify the obstacles that are standing in your way.  People come to Passages to find freedom from addiction and they end up finding their flow.  You will begin to feel your negative emotions, and instead of numbing them with substances, look for ways to grow and challenge yourself towards higher states of existence. Once you experience the “high” from being in the flow, you will never want to return to substances again.  Now, that is something you won’t learn from the 12-step programs… that is what makes Passages distinct from the rest.  You find your flow at Passages in Malibu.

 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Power to Overcome Addiction

Power to Overcome Addiction: Three Steps to Freedom

By Dr. Kerri Heath

Admitting that you are facing a life-threatening problem like alcoholism and drug addiction can seem overwhelming.  Thoughts and excuses may run through your mind like “there is no way I can stop” or “I am not strong enough to quit.”  The pain and problems that you face might feel too big to face without the substances that numb the pain.  And no one should try to face this alone.

First, surround yourself with people who have beaten the deadly and debilitating struggles with addictions.  Passages is one of the few rehabilitation centers that can report stories of people who truly overcame addiction for good.  A home like Passages can become a source of strength, as you overcome addiction with a team of physicians, mental health professionals and spiritual teachers that help you find your new path in life.  The owner, Pax Prentiss, shares his story openly with every client about his journey towards freedom from addiction.  His story comforts and inspires others who also want to be liberated from addiction.  It is important to find people who have paved the way for you in your journey towards freedom.

Second, you must have faith in yourself.  There are so many stories about people who find healing once they believe it is possible.  If you do not believe you can change, then you most likely never will.  The 12-step programs initiate a belief that humans are powerless to substances and need to rely on an external higher power to assist them in the process towards freedom. Although it is important to develop a spiritual practice in the path towards recovery, it is also essential to come from a source of power and belief that you are in control. We can learn a lot from various religions around the world that try to empower people to believe in themselves in order to be freed from suffering.  In the Bible, we read many accounts where Jesus said, “Your faith has healed you.  Go in peace and be freed from your suffering” (Mark 5:30-34).  Buddha taught that the truth of suffering is also the path to end suffering. He believed that dealing with the pain was the only way to end it and be free.  Once you believe that healing is possible, and face the source of your pain, you will be amazed at how quickly your suffering can end.

Third, try to envision the greatest version of yourself.  Patti Davis, who was the daughter of President Ronald Reagan, wrote an essay in Newsweek’s “My Turn” about her addiction to cocaine and how grateful she would have been for a rehabilitation center like Passages.  After celebrating five years of freedom, she shared what helped her decide to stop using.  She no longer wanted to neglect the higher part of herself that shares a connection with the Divine (God).  This place of perfect joy, power, and bliss comes when we align with the Spirit of God that Patti described. The greatest version of you becomes a reality when you align with a higher purpose in life and a call to serve others.

When you are ready to face the pain, develop a spiritual practice, end the suffering and be free to create a new life of freedom, there is a family waiting to help you make the passage towards a new life at Passages in Malibu.

 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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How to Help a Struggling Friend

By Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC

“Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light.”- Helen Keller

Myth: Asking a friend if they are feeling depressed, angry, or suicidal will make them more at risk of harming themselves or others. Fact: Asking tough questions show you care which in turn opens up the dialogue for getting that person the help they need.

  • Know the warning signs of risk of suicide or depression so you can recognize them in yourself, a friend, coworker, or family member Know the 5 Signs
  1. Personality Change
  2. Agitation
  3. Withdrawn
  4. Poor Self-Care
  5. Hopeless
  • Be a listening ear. Check in on someone you care about and ask how he or she is doing. You don’t have to be an expert or trained professional to show someone you care.
  • Know the number to call for hotlines, local police, or dial 911 in an emergency. You can never be too cautious when it comes to your life or the life of someone else.
  • Share resources with friends and family. The more open you are about discussing difficult thoughts, feelings, and situations, the less stigma attached to asking for help.
  • Post positive messages on social media that focus on solution and self-care. Show others that self-love and taking care of one’s mental health is just as important as physical health.

Selected resources

BRAVE Crisis Text Line: text BRAVE to 741741

Know the Five Signs: changedirection.org

Facebook BRAVE Crisis Text Line

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255)

  • If you or a friend is struggling, start by sharing those feelings with someone trustworthy. You can also text BRAVE to 741741 which is a free, 24/7, confidential support hotline with trained counselors on the other end.
  • If you want to get someone directly on the phone, call 800-273-TALK (8255) where you can speak to a trained counselor ready to listen to you or someone else.
  • You can reach out to Facebook BRAVE Crisis Text Line by hitting “Send Message” on their Facebook page.
  • It is a good idea to program any of the helpline numbers on your phone so that you have on hand in a crisis. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) is also a great resource.

 

Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC is an educator, published researcher, and social media marketing consultant for therapists. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Board Certified-TeleMental Health Provider (BC-TMH), and Suicide Prevention Instructor (QPR) under the National Board for Certified Counselors.

 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Dance/Movement Therapy at Passages Rehab

Dance/Movement Therapy at Passages Rehab

By Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC

“The truest expression of a people is in its dances and its music. Bodies never lie.” –Agnes de Mille

Dance/Movement Therapy—(DMT) is the psychotherapeutic use of movement (a core component of dance) to promote emotional, social, cognitive and physical integration of the individual. Used as a treatment method for people of all ages and backgrounds, DMT can be taught individually, with couples or families, and in a group format. It is especially effective for individuals with developmental, medical, social, physical and psychological impairments (The American Dance Therapy Association ADTA).

How it Works: DMT is founded on the idea that motion and emotion are interconnected. People in treatment communicate conscious and unconscious feelings through dance, which allows a therapist to respond in kind. Dance therapists help people work on issues through the use of a “movement vocabulary” that is centered around physical expression instead of words (GoodTherapy.org).

In an interview with Dr. Charné Furcron, LPC, BC-DMT, BCC, ACS, the ADTA dance therapist shines light on the benefits of dance both personally and as an instructor:

Dancing soothed her soul, helping her grow into the fullness of herself. With healing dance as a foundation, Charné has engineered a life full of artistry, dance performance,   teaching, therapy, and transformation for herself and the many others she has worked with (ADTA).

Benefits of DMT include an increase in self-esteem, body image, and insight into one’s behavior. It is also useful for stress reduction, disease prevention, and mood management. DMT has been shown to be an effective coping skill. Adding this skill to the toolbox of healthy coping strategies is particularly useful with clients who struggle with substance use and addiction.

Selected resources

Dance / Movement Therapy (DMT). GoodTherapy.org.

Profiles of Dance/Movement Therapists. American Dance Therapy Association.

 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC is an educator, published researcher, and social media consultant. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC) (e-therapy) and Suicide Prevention Instructor (QPR) under the National Board for Certified Counselors.

Don't Be Afraid to Ask for Help

How to Ask for Help

By Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC

“In the depth of winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer.”
–Albert Camus

When it comes to personal struggles with drug and alcohol use, asking for help can seem like an impossible feat. Individuals who have suffered from substance use and addiction in the past know that the hardest part is admitting they have lost the ability to manage their lives.

The mind is a powerful thing. When it comes to addiction, thoughts and feelings get so overwhelming that at times denial and justification can overshadow the negative consequences of destructive behavior. When active in one’s addiction, rational thought becomes clouded and fear of exposing what has been going on “behind the scenes” takes over. Common factors that delay asking for help can include

Fear of:

  • Shame and guilt
  • Anger and resentment from coworkers, family, and friends
  • Having children removed from the home
  • Loss of relationship/divorce
  • Loss of job
  • Loss of reputation in the community
  • Loss of independence
  • Living up to stigma
  • Exposing other problem areas/struggles

These fears and more may prevent an addicted individual from seeking help sooner. The more serious the addiction, the less ownership one takes over their health and wellbeing, and there are times when hopelessness and desperation lead to dangerous and destructive behavior, completely consuming everything else. The irony is that in admitting defeat, the individual is actually demonstrating incredibly courageous behavior. Even if some of their fears of exposing the alcohol and substance use come to fruition (loss of reputation, anger from loved ones, etc.), unless the addicted individual gets the help they need, they may never live long enough to find out if those fears actually do come true.

Making the decision to ask for help is the first part, choosing whom to tell is the second. Given that an individual may have any number of the fears listed above, deciding when and with whom to relay this information is an added stressor. Some people find that testing the waters by calling an anonymous hotline or speaking to a mental health professional confidentially is a start. Others my intuitively know safe individuals in their social circle (who most likely already have an idea) that they can share with. Once the behavior is put out there, an addicted individual will soon see the fact that they do not have to struggle alone. When shared with the appropriate people or through the necessary channel, the recovery process can begin.

 

Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC is an educator, published researcher, and social media consultant. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC) (e-therapy) and Suicide Prevention Instructor (QPR) under the National Board for Certified Counselors.

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Photo by Kaizen Nguyễn

Visual Arts Therapy at Passages Addiction Treatment Centers

By Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC

“All art intuitively apprehends coming changes in the collective unconsciousness.” -Carl Gustav Jung

Using imagination to create something fresh symbolizes rebirth, new beginnings, and rejuvenation. At Passages Malibu, art therapy is used by some of our life purpose counselors as a way to help you further tap into and express your innermost feelings, emotions, desires, needs, hopes, and dreams. By utilizing a set of diverse methods of addiction treatment, we are able to deal with your addiction from all angles and concentrate on every aspect of your healing process. All that is needed to begin is an open mind and willingness to explore your creative side.

3 Ways to Use Visual Arts Therapy:

Mandala—the word “mandala” is Sanskrit for “circle.” The mandala is a graphic pattern created by enclosing a square with a deity on each side and is widely used as an aid to meditation. “It represents wholeness, and can be seen as a model for the organizational structure of life itself–a cosmic diagram that reminds us of our relation to the infinite, the world that extends both beyond and within our bodies and minds” (The Mandala Project). You can begin by using printable mandala designs for coloring. Creating a mandala assists with an increase in focused attention, an aid to meditation, and for many a spiritual experience.

Vision Board—sometimes referred to as a “dream board,” the vision board is a collage of images, pictures, clippings, words, or other materials that represent your goals, hopes, and dreams in life. The collage allows you to envision what your future might hold.

Sketchbook—a book or pad of paper used for creating illustrations and drawings. All you need to begin is a book of blank pages and something to sketch with. The Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University in 2006 suggested that there were two broad categories for classifying sketches:

  • Observation: this focuses on the documentation of the external world and includes many such travel and nature studies and sketches recording an artist’s travels.
  • Invention: this follows the artists’ digressions and internal journeys as they develop compositional ideas

After beginning their unique book of illustrations, many users find that personalizing the sketchbook is also a healing part of the process. Be creative and think outside the box. Decorate your sketchbook to reflect your personality.

 

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC is an educator, published researcher, and social media consultant. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC) (e-therapy) and Suicide Prevention Instructor (QPR) under the National Board for Certified Counselors.

What is Art Therapy | Substance Abuse Treatment at Passages Rehab

By Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC

“I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.” -Michelangelo

Artistic and creative expression has a connection to our mental health. In recent years, the use of art therapy has successfully been incorporated into substance use and addiction treatment plans. You do not have to be Michelangelo to benefit from art therapy; all you need is an open mind and willingness to explore your creative side.

At Passages Malibu, art therapy includes several artistic mediums. These include drawing, painting, watercolors, and collages. The vision board, for example, is a collage of images, pictures, clippings, words, or other materials that represent your goals, hopes, and dreams in life.

            “Art Therapy is used to improve cognitive and sensorimotor functions, foster self- esteem and self-awareness, cultivate emotional resilience, promote insight, enhance social skills, reduce and resolve conflicts and distress, and advance societal and ecological change.  Through integrative methods, art therapy engages the mind, body, and spirit in ways that are distinct from verbal articulation alone.” (The American Art Therapy Association)

It is not always what we say that sheds light on our well being, it’s how we express ourselves through what we create. Creativity in art therapy addresses developmental, motivational, affective and cognitive processes. It allows for the subconscious (mental processing without conscious awareness) to bring underlying emotions safely to the surface. For this reason, it is extremely helpful for individuals to process otherwise scary or confusing thoughts, feelings, and memories through artistic expression.

A feeling of isolation is common among those suffering from substance use and addiction. Bringing people together through the arts is a positive way to make a healing connection. A therapist will work with his/her client to effectively support personal and relational treatment goals. Developing a shared bond with the counselor and others through creative expression is an integral part of art therapy.

 

Susan Finley, Ed.D., NCC is a published researcher, educator, and social media consultant. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC) (e-therapy) and Suicide Prevention Instructor (QPR) under the National Board for Certified Counselors.

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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Substance Abuse and Denial

By Jennifer McDougall

When someone is heavily addicted to drugs on alcohol, it is not uncommon for them to be in denial for the need of help. Many people who abuse drugs and alcohol don’t want to admit they have a problem. They may think the use is “normal” or acceptable because our society has extended the limit on what is morally responsible by glorifying the use of drugs and alcohol on social media with memes and humorous YouTube videos. The truth is that substance abuse related issues need to be addressed and if you’re dealing with someone who is unwilling to admit to a problem, it can be quite frustrating to be around them or talk to them about the situation.

Whether this person is a friend or family member, it’s important you address the issue with them by at least pointing it out. One of the best ways to talk to someone who is in denial of a drug and alcohol addiction is to ask questions. By answering the questions, they will have the chance to hear themselves out loud and begin processing a revelation that they’ve been trying to hide or run from for a while now. Here are 10 questions you can ask that will be helpful in discussing a substance abuse related issue and get them at least reflecting on what direction they are steering their life and hopefully change the course of their destiny for the better.

  1. Do you think your drinking (or drug) use affects your job?
  2. Are your drinking (or drub) habits affecting your relationships?
  3. Have you thought about just staying sober? If no, what makes you feel uncomfortable about staying sober?
  4. How often to drink alone? (Point out that this behavior is dangerous and could be detrimental to their health, career, etc. due to poor judgment and bad decision making)
  5. Is there something bothering you that you’d like to talk about?
  6. Are you drinking (or using) out of loneliness or boredom? (Suggest other things they could do instead)
  7. Do you ever feel like you should quit drinking (or using) but don’t know how? (Suggest they contact Passages for information about inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation)
  8. What do you usually do when you get home from work to unwind?
  9. Have your friends or family members ever mentioned concern about your drinking (drug use) habits? Do you agree with them? Why do you think they bring that up?
  10. What is the longest period of time you’ve gone without drinking (or using drugs)?

How to Contact Passages Addiction Treatment Centers:

Call Passages Addiction Treatment Centers today if you or a loved one is battling an addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our admissions department is available 24/7 and can be reached directly by calling our toll-free number at (888) 397-0112. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

Passages, Where Addiction Ends and Life Begins™

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